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(Foto by Susan Lysik) 



15th Annual Cabrillo Music Festival 

September 17 & 18 



This marks the 15th year that Bay Area mu- 
sicians have made their summer pilgrimage 
to the seaside town of Aptos, California, just a few 
miles south of Santa Cruz, to participate in one of 
the most unique music festivals in the United States. 
There, in an informal atmosphere, where they are 
housed by the local citizenry during their stay, some 
of the most interesting and vital music-making in the 
western classical music genre is held each year. For 
fourteen of those fifteen years, KPFA has been for- 
tunate enough to present, with carloads of record- 
ing equipment a'nd a crew of recording engineers, 
Cabrillo's music to thousands who were otherwise 
unable to attend the festivities. 

This year, Dennis Russell Davies, the 33-year old 
director of the Festival, returns for his fourth season 
to lead thirteen orchestral and chamber concerts. 
Among this year's featured guests are two very well- 
known celebrities, composer John Cage and cellist 
Janos Starker. Cage was present for both weekends 
of concerts this year, including a wonderful Satie/ 
Cage evening in which the rarely-heard piece 
Socrate by Satie was followed by Cage's Cheap 
Imitation (based on Socrate). Starker performed 
with concertmaster Romuald Tecco and pianist 
Davies in the familiar Suite for Violin, Piano and 
Small Orchestra by Lou Harrison, one movement of 
which has served as the theme song for KPFA's 
Fruit Punch program for quite some time. He also 



performed concerti by Walton and Beethoven as 
well as sonatas by Beethoven and Debussy. 

As usual, Davies scheduled works by earlier com- 
posers to be examined in some depth. One year, it 
was Haydn; another, Schumann. This year, the focus 
was shared by Beethoven, Debussy, and Satie. So, a 
goodly part of the schedule is devoted to their works. 
Another guest was conductor Stanislaw Skrowaczew- 
ski, recently-retired director of the Minnesota Sym- 
phony, who directed the West Coast premiere of his 
Music at Night. And organist Anthony Newman re- 
turned to present his Orchestral Cycle which was pre- 
viewed as a work-in-progress at last year's event. 

This year, the Festival continued its policy, ini- 
tiated under conductor Davies and Cabrillo Board 
President Manuel Santana, of reaching out to vari- 
ous Santa Cruz County communities by playing 
concerts in several locations off the Cabrillo College 
campus where regular events are held. The splendid 
final concert was held in the newly-restored Mission 
San Juan Bautista, culminating a Sunday long San 
Juan Fiesta Day. Other events were held in Capitola 
and Santa Cruz, including a free concert outdoors in 
San Lorenzo Park on Duck Island. 

There were two experimental music concerts co- 
ordinated by KPFA's Charles Amirkhanian. The 
first, entitled Straight Flush: New Tapes/Films/ 
Dance included world premiers by Californians 
Margaret Fisher, Larry Wendt and Allen Strange, 



as well as West Coast premieres by Lars-Gunnar 
Bodin, Laurie Anderson, Bernard Heidsieck, Molly 
Davies and Annea Lockwood. Another event, en- 
titled Only the Lonely: Music of the American Ex- 
perimental Tradition, featured the world premiere 
of an electronic music piece composed in 1938 by 
Johanna M. Beyer as well as Beyer's Tlxree Move- 
ments for Percussion (1939) dedicated to John 
Cage. The world premiere of John Cage's Quartets 
for 41 Players and Peter Garland's Obstacles of Sleep 
for two sirens, ratchet, lion's roar, piccolo and piano 
were also heard along with player piano music by 
Conlon Nancarow and Four Iroquois Dances by 
Colin McPhee. 

The complete schedule for these events is printed 
on page 19 of the Folio. The programs will be heard 
during a two-day orgy of music ranging from the 
first West Coast performance of Keith Jarrett's Ritual 
(written for and played by Dennis Russell Davies) to 
the Beethoven Mass in C Major heard in the sanctu- 
ary of Mission San Juan Bautista, with the combined 
chorus and orchestra at full strength, beautifully 
recorded in Dolby stereo by KPFA. We hope you'll 
be with us on Saturday and Sunday, September 17 
and 1 8, for some or all of these programs. If we run 
out of time on the 18th without having completed 
the cycle, the Morning Concert of the 21st has been 
reserved for the remainder. 



2 KPFA FOLIO/September 1977 



KPF A STAFF 

: VOLUME 28 : Issue 9 : September 1977 

2207 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley, CA 94704 (415) 848-6767 

KPFA, FM 94.1 : KPFB, FM 89.3 : KFCF, FM 88.1 

• 

ADMINISTRATION: Warren Van Orden (Business Manager), Marion Jansen (Bookkeep- 
er), Roland Young (Program Director), Ellen Dubrowin (Subscription Registrar), Eve Buckner 
(Subscription Assistant & Volunteer Coordinator), Padreigin McGillicuddy (Promotion Direc- 
tor), Reginald Lockett (Folio Editor), Janet Chann ( Folio Art Advisor), Cyn Zarco 
(Folio Art Director), Jerry Sager (Folio Advertising & Phone Project Director), Leigh Light- 
foot (Folio Advertising), Kathy Anderson, Richard Brandenburg, Ranan Burstein, Paci 
Hammond, Hallie Donnelly, Jack Harmell, Michael Lapp, Sam Hay, Mark Miller, Melissa 
Naplan, Robbie Osman, Libba Swinburn, Richard Wolinsky, Leanne, Kati & Karla. 
PRODUCTION: Randy Thorn (Acting Director), Klift Thomas, Avotcja Jiltonilro, Martha 
Oelman, Doug Maisel, Jim Epstein. Volunteer Technicians: Susan Elisabeth, Kevin Vance, 
Jim Semer, Llyana Landes, Lou Judson, Jody Aaitlin, Paul Ness, David Feld, Tony Ferro, 
Richard Cooper, Steve O'Neal. 

ENGINEERING: Wayne Wagner, Steve Hawes, Jane Clemmenson, Larry Wood, Bismark 
Williams, Tony Ferro, Doug Maisel. 

MUSIC: Charles Amirkhanian (Sound Sensitivity Director), Richard Aldrich, Mary Berg, 
Tom Buckner, Bill Collins, Gerda Daly, Tom Diamant, Paul Dresher, David Dunaway, Ray 
Edlund, Phil Elwood, Ron Erickson, Tony Ferro, Michael Goodwin, Gail Gove, Shafi Hakim, 
Stephen Hill, Les Honig, Jane Hunter, Melvin Jahn, Lou Judson, Richard Letts, Jon Longcore, 
John Lumsdaine, Ingram Marshall, Steve Mayer, Tom Mazzolini, Larry McCombs, Howard 
Moscovitz, Susan Ohori, Ron Pellegrino, Henry Peters (Record Librarian), Chris Potter, Emmit 
Powell, David Roach, G.S. Sachdev, Joel Sachs, Bari Scott, Robert Shumaker, Eva Soltes, 
Carl Stolz, Chris Strachwizt, Allan Ulrich, Steve Wolfe. Focus on Women Composers: Fleur 
Helsingor, April McMahon, Joan Medlin, Virginia Kosanovic, Susan Sailow. 
DRAMA & LITERATURE: Erik Bauersfeld (Director), Byron Bryant, Michael Butler, 
Bud Cary, Gail Chugg, Fred Cody, Re Couture, Pat Ellsberg, Bea Frankel, Barry Garelik, 
Michael Goodwin, May Gardner, Henrietta Harris, Lee Jenkins, Toby Lawson, Padreigin 
McGillicuddy, Adam David Miller, Jeffrey Mishlove, Jim Nisbet, Irene Oppenheim, Tom 
Parkinson, Ishmael Reed, Nola Roiz, Max Schwartz, Jim Semer, Alan Soldofsky, Mylos 
Sonka, Don Sortor, Michael Toms, John Fitzgibbon, Larry Davidson, Al Young, Jana Harris. 
NEWS: Alan Snitow & Helen Mickiewicz (News Co-Directors), Peggy Berryhill (Staff Re- 
porter), Jill Hannum, Vic Bedoian (Fresno Bureau), Lonnie Wong (Sacramento Correspon- 
dent), Laurie Garrett (Science Editor), Richard Wolinsky (Sports Editor), Stephanie Allan, 
Paul Allen, Bob Barron, Liz Barron, Larry Bensky, Eve Buckner, Gabriel Castillo, Jim Cumbo, 
Lili Francklyn, Lewis Freedberg, Sonny Garcia, Diane Kallo, Charles Lyle, Kathy McAnally, 
Ellen McCarthy, John Rieger, Kate Rowan, Yafet Tekle. San Francisco Bureau: Elizabeth 
Gorss, Tony Rodriguez, Paul Rosensteil, Sheila McAleenan, Ted Schade. Berkeley City Coun- 
cil: Richard Wolinsky. Women's News: L.B., Judith Ehrlich, Deborah Schwartz, Betty Szudy 
Washington Bureau: National Press Building, Washington, D.C.: Ted Clark, Elin O'Leary. 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS: Scott McAllister (Interim Director), Victor Silverman (Public Service 
Announcements), Larry Bensky (AM/FM while Kris Welch is on vacation), Rosaline Wallis 
(AM Reception), Vic Bedoian, Louise Billotte, John Burke, Frances Emley, Laurie Garrett, 
Craig George, Adi Gevins, Yvonne Golden, Lee Jenkins, Helga Lohr-Bailey, Philip Maldari, 
William Mandel, Mel Martynn, Ken McEIdowney, Dick Meister, Muntu, Bob Nicholson, 
Mama O'Shea, Rose Panico, Susan Reeds, Rick Reis, Laurie Simms, Bill Sokol, Peggy Stein, 
Teish, Andy Weismann, John Yellin, Kevin Vance. Bay City Blues: Tom Brom, Craig Gordon, 
Vic Rubin, Kenn Russell, Ed Schoenfeld. Fruit Punch: Guy Bishop-Pizarro, Kevin Burke, 
Roland Schembari, Andy Seal, Leigh Watson. Congressional Record: Jan Daemelt, John Ford, 
Gene Genther, Jim Semer, Catherine Webb, Kaethe Aemach. Environmental News: Aileen, 
Alfandary, Glen Barlow, Rob Gendreau, Steve Mooser, Brent Stuart. Ain't I A Woman I/Wo- 
man's Programming: Susan Elisabeth, Shebar Windstone, Fran Tornebene, Clare Freewoman, 
The Women's News collective, Berkeley Women's Health collective radio project. Media 
Alliance of Northern California. 

THIRD WORLD: Bari Scott (Third World Director), Michael Butler (Third World Resource 
Assistant), Tarabu Betserai (Third World Bureau Coordinator). Ahora: Andres Alegria, Isabel 
Alegria, Linda, Quintana, Jose Maria Lopez. Chinese Youth Voice. Latinoamerica Despierta/ 
Latin America Awakens: Mario Cabrera, Miguel Fernandez, Soledad Herrera. Iranian Students' 
Association. Reggae Experience: Tony Wright, Ralph Miller. Passing Thru & Night Kitchen: 
Bari Scott. Great Black Music: Jerel De Leon, Bob Brown. Ask Your Mama: Michael Butler. 
Tell It Like It Is: Odyssey School Radio Collective. Pieces of Dreams: Andrew White. Sketches 
in Sound: Klift Thomas, Yolanda D. Smith. Third World Bureau: Andres Alegria, Isabel 
Alegria, Don Foster, Yafet Tekle, Christina Medina, Aurora L. Morales, Norman Jayo. Your 
Space: Yvette Morris- Anderson. Donnel's Music Theatre: Donnel Lewis. Native American 
Culture: Peggy Berryhill, Pat Ramirez, Sue Reginald, California Indian News. 
KPFA LOCAL ADVISORY BOARD: R. Gordon Agnew, Bob Barron (Chairperson), 
Bud Bliss, Hal Brydon, Muntu Buchongo, Steve Budde, Bob DeBolt, Frances Emley, Peter 
Franck, Laurie Garrett, Bob Hensley, Barbara Hyde, Oliver Jones, Bert McGuire (Secretary), 
Bill Sokol, Bert Thomas, Jo Anne Wallace (Manager), Catherine Webb. 
PACIFIC A NATIONAL BOARD: R. Gordon Agnew (Honorary Chairperson), Isabel 
Alegria, Bob Barron, Carol Breshears, Charles Brousse, Ralph Engelman, Peter Franck, 
Margaret Glaser, Edwin Goodman, Oscar Hanigsberg (Treasurer), Ken Jenkins (President), 
David Lampel, Thelma Maltzer, Jonas Rosenfield Jr., Peter Tagger, Tracey Westen. 



KPFA is a 59,000 watt listener-sponsored community radio station broadcasting to most 
of Northern California. KPFB is a 1 50 watt station for areas of Berkeley that cannot re- 
ceive KPFA. The address is 2207 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley, CA 94704, (415) 848-6767. 
The stations are licensed to the Pacifica Foundation and are the oldest stations of their 
kind in the country. Subscriptions are available at $30/year ($1 5 low income). The KPFA 
FOLIO is distributed free to all subscribers. The KPFA siqnal is also broadcast in Fresno 
through the facilities of station KFCF (88.1 MHz, P.O. Box 881, Fresno, CA 93714). 
Pacifica also broadcasts in New York (WBAI, 369 E. 62nd St., New York, NY 10021 

(212) 826-0400); Los Angeles (KPFK, 3720 Cahuenga, North Hollywood, CA 91604 

(213) 877-2711); Houston (KPFT. 419 Lovett Blvd. Houston, Tx 77006 (713) 526- 
3800); Washington, D.C. (WPFW, 1030-1 5th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005, (202) 
223-8520). Programs broadcast on all Pacifica stations are available from Pacifica Pro- 
gram Service, 5316 Venice Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90019 (213) 931-1625. KPFA is a 
member of the Association of California Public Radio Stations. KPFA augments is pro- 
gramming with information and material from the following services: Africa News Ser- 
vice, Associated Press, InterNews, the Pacifica Program Services, Reuter, and the Third 
World News Bureau. 



Report 

to the Listener 

After 2 X A weeks as Program Director, I feel very enthusiastic 
about KPFA's promising future. This is in part brought about 
by the fact that most of the staff seems very receptive to the 
programming changes I have proposed. I had originally planned 
to write a detailed analysis concerning those changes for the 
October Folio, but I received criticism regarding the possible 
effects of those proposals from a listener and, consequently, 
have decided to print that criticism along with my response 
in PROSE & CONS. While all aspects and specific details of the proposals and 
their possible effects are not contained in this debate, it is, nonetheless, a satis- 
factory starting point. 




***** 



Joanne Wallace, our current Station Manager, and Scott McAllister, 
our current Public Affairs Director, are leaving the station as of Septem- 
ber 15. We are in the process of filling those positions and hope to ac- 
complish this as soon as possible. 



***** 



Our Fall Minithon dates are set for October 14 to 31, with a goal of 
$50,000. We now find ourselves in a summer slump, and, as a result, we 
must raise $5,000 before October 14. If this is done, our Minithon in- 
come will not have to be used to pay back debts, but can be invested in 
the 1977-78 fiscal budget which begins October 1. 1 would also like to 
urge all current subscribers to renew your subscriptions as soon as they 
expire so that we can be assured of your continued support. 

***** 

Finally, I would like to call to your attention some of our September 
Program Highlights: The Grass Valley Festival— September 3 & 4, The 
International Hotel Special-September 10 and our annual broadcast of 
the Cabrillo Music Festival-September 17 & 18. 

***** 

Stay tuned for the new, improved and changing sound of KPFA! 

Roland Young, Program Director 

KPFA JULY SUBSCRIPTION REPORT 



BILL OF THE MONTH 


4798.00 


NEW/INSTALLMENT 


4054.43 


RENEWALS 


6972.50 


DONATIONS 


921.25 


TOTAL REGULAR $$$$ 


16,746. 18 


NEW SUBS PLEDGED 




Regular 


51 


Phone Project 


15 


Paid w/o Pledge 


16 


TOTAL 


82 


NEW BILL OF THE MONTH 




Regular 


15 


Phone Project 


1 


Upgrades 


6 


TOTAL 


22 


RENEWALS PAID 


325 . 


PAID SUBSCRIBERS 


9980 


subs: awaiting payment 


971 


COMP' FOLIOS SENT 


1019 


REG' ANDCOMP* FOLIOS 


11970 



KPFA exchanges mailing lists with other organizations to increase our subscribership. If you 
object to having your name exchanged as a result of being one of our subscribers, please 
write to our Subscription department, enclosing a recent FOLIO label if possible, and we wil 
delete your name from our exchange lists. 



Folio's are not forwarded by the post office. 
Before you move — please let KPFA know. 



attach folio 




label here 



New Address. 
City 



.State. 



Zip. 



Please send your address changes; KPFA must pay 254 for each Folio returned. 



September 1977/KPFA FOLIO, 3 



er s 



Septemb 

HIGHLIGHTS 



Grass Valley Bluegrass Festival 

All Jay long, Sept. 3 & 4 

The second annual Grass Valley Bluegrass Festival, held June 17, 18 and 19, 
will be broadcast all day Saturday. September 3. and Sunday. September 4. The 
show will feature The Crispy Critter Band; The Arkansas Shieks; High In The Sad- 
dle: Boise Deluxe; Lost Highway; Bill White & His Friends; Good N' Country; 
Country Ham; The New Tonto Basin Boys; High Country; Walt Beck; The Allen 
Brothers; Tom Sauber & Tom Carter; The Good Ole Persons; The River City 
Ramblers; Vern Williams & His Band; The Overlook Mountain Boys; Done Gone 
and Frank Wakefield & The Good Ole Boys. 



Stand By/ Live from the I-Hotel 





Sept. 10 12 noon 



On Monday, September 10, we will be rebroadcasting the live coverage of the 
evictions of the Tenants of the International Hotel. Preparation for this coverage 
began almost two years ago when the Third World News Bureau first considered 
their journalistic responsibility. Since that time the Bureau has produced over 
sixty live broadcasts from the H-Hotel, the last of which was during the evictions 
on August 4. The Third World Bureau will continue to cover the struggle of the 
tenants for low-income housing. The rebroadcast will begin at 12 noon. (See 
feature article on page 5.) 



Middle East Documentary 



Sept 12 10 p.m. 



This Special News Department documentary will examine the results of Secre- 
tary of State Cyrus Vance's recent six nation tour of the Middle East. It will 
also look at the rumored Carter plan for a Mid-East peace settlement and the 
positions of the contending parties towards it, particularly in light of the recent 
victory in Israel of the Right Wing Likud Party. The Likud Party is headed 
by Menachem Begin who is now the Israeli Premier. His leadership will have 
a powerful impact on" any peace settlement because it represents the coming to 
power of a definite hard-line group in which Israel favors annexation of occu- 
pied Arab lands. This is a position internationally condemned. Even the 
Carter Administration has critized it. The documentary will look at the pos- 
sibilities of peace or war and examine the stands of the Arab governments, 
Palestinian movements, Left and Communist parties and of the major powers. 



World Music MohiL 



Sept 19 8:30 pan. . 

Street Music: tapes and records of professional musicians making their living by 
the side of the road. Hear the roots of rock 'n roll in the music of the Griot 
communities of north Africa and the roots of Indian classical music in the 
songs of the wandering Yogis of western India and Pakistan. Music to enliven 
the bazaar and sidewalk - ring shouts, finger cymbals, and tambourines. Pre- 
sented by David Roach. 






Happy Birthday, Trane! 



Sept 20-23 3 a.m. 

You are absolutely, definitely and totally invited to celebrate the Happy Birth- 
day of John Coltrane September 20-23. Klift and Yolanda will play many, if not 
all, of the great tunes of one of the Musical Dieties of 20th Century and beyond. 



Changing Directions: A Feminist Soap Opera 



Sept 20 10-30 p.m. 



This new radio serial drama brings the soap opera form into a 
new arena as it realistically portrays some of the changes the 
Women's Movement has brought to the lives of women, men 
and children. Listen in on Tuesday, September 20 at 10:30 p.m. 



The House of the Solitary Maggot 

Sept 19-23 11:15 a.m. 
Sept 22 1:15 p.m. 



James Purdy is in Berkeley for a visit and to finish his new novel, A Day after 
the Fair. Tune in on Thursday, September 22, at 1:15 p.m. and hear him talk 
with Byron Bryant about Malcolm and his other novels, short stories and plays. 
And then, tune in for the Morning Readings at 11:15 a.m. Monday through 
Friday, September 19 through 23 and hear him read from his novel. The House 
of the Solitary Maggot. 




Ducks Breath Mystery Theatre 



Sept 27 9 p.m. 



The Duck's Breath Mystery Theatre has picked up rave reviews, since it was 
formed in Iowa in 1975, performing before both television and live audiences. 
This 5-man group creates a world of multi-level parody, assorted absurdities, slap- 
stick and fractured song and dance on stage. Duck's Breath has been hailed as 
"successors to the legacy of the Marx Brothers." Listen in Monday, September 27, 
for a special half-hour extravaganza with this outrageously zany group whose per- 
formances have left Bay Area theater audiences gasping with laughter. 



, 



4 KPtfA-F0M<a/S«p*pml?mvW«7 



raniniiiHiiBRiiBMHiiniininfflHniiiHiiinniBiiii^HHffli 




PROSE AND CONS" 






Ml 




A FEW PROFOUND QUESTIONS 



- Dear Mr. Young: 

- I approached the announcement of your intention for KPFA's 

- programming last night with great anticipation. Not long into the 

- announcement my anticipation turned to considerable alarm. The 
Z concern and questions that came to my mind were those of your 
~ last two callers. I don't think you clearly answered those questions. 

- Talk of "mix" and "KPFA sound" was all pretty vague. The word 
Z that came through clear as a bell, though - related to "public ser- 
™ vice" programs - was "condense". 

- I agree with you that there is sometimes "rhetoric" delivered 

- to the public from KPFA's current issues programs, but I think a 
Z greater service could be done the listeners by improving the tech- 
~ niques of delivery than by condensing the programs. Your word 
""condense" seemed to have been applied alone to those programs 
"which use the spoken word as their primary vehicle of communi- 

- cation and not to programs which are primarily musical. Are we 
\ then to assume that the condensing of current issues programs will 
r result in time added to programs of music? Will less time be devoted 
. to the spoken word? 

- Music now dominates the air time of KPFA. During the month 
j^of August, KPFA will devote approximately 483'/2 hours-to music 

and 260'/2 hours to the spoken word. By the standards of other stat- 
ions, that is a phenomenal amount of time given to the spoken 
Iword, but KPFA is giving music nearly twice as .much time, mat 
"is time in which the listener is being entertained, not informed; 
-time in which the listener is made to "feel good," not enlight- 

- ened; time in which the listener is lulled into euphoria, not alarm- 
Z ed to the political, economic, cultural and chemical despotism con 

- trolling his and her world. Life may breath sweetest with music, 

- but how long can life last when we take in cancer-producing ag- 
Z ents with every bite of food and every breath of air? It may be 
Z delightful listening to music, but how much time can we spend 



being delighted when the scythe of nuclear melt-down hangs over our 
heads? Can we become sufficiently enlightened, fearful and angry to 
mass and move with the weight of opposition to change this future 
thrust upon us, while being delighted by musical notes? It is a diver- 
sion - "music soothes the savage beast." It also calms the peasant. 

Of course, people want music, and to a lesser degree, they need 
it. They also want enlightenment, and, unfortunately, to a greater de- 
gree than they actively seek it, they need it. That is not so in all places, 
but true enough here in the apathetic United States. 

I cite its opposite example in the Cuban state of mind. In the H. 
Upmann cigar factory in Havana, 216 women kept their hands busily 
rolling cigars but had nothing to busy their minds. They did not have 
supermarket music piped to them, as is done in U.S. factories, but, 
even before the revolution, hired at their own expense a reader for 
their "entertainment." Now, such readers are on government salary, 
but it speaks well for the Cuban character that these women pooled 
from their paltry pre-revolution wages money to purchase enlighten- 
ment while tending to their work. It speaks well for the revolution 
that they seek to continue this practice rather than slide into apathy. 
We need music, but music is not going to change the agony in the 
lives of the oppressed minorities and poor or remove the danger to the 
lives of the public whole. Only enlightenment, fear, anger and mobil- 
ization can do that, and every moment spent dallying in the rarefied 
world of golden notes and silver tones is a moment longer to human 
welfare, dignity and freedom. 

KPFA, with pride and considerable justification, claims to be a pro- g 
gressive station. In the name of progress I ask you not to condense 
the current issues programs that enlighten the public, and will, hope- 
fully, to the point of mobilization and significant change, but to 
enlarge those programs. You owe it to the humans you serve. 

Gordon Kirkwood-Yates 
Represa, California 



I'D LIKE A YEAR'S 
SUBSCRIPTION TO KPFA 



A FEW PROFOUND ANSWERS 



Name. 



Address .- 

City/State/Zip ^ 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

[ ] $30/year Regular 

[ ] $15/year Low Income " 

[ ] $45/year Family/Group " r 

[ } $5/month Bill of the Month • 

[ ] $100/year Sustaining Z 

We'd appreciate full payment now, but if - 

you want to be billed, please tell us how: '. 

[ ] Semi-annually ( 1 /a rate enclosed) I 

[ ] Quarterly (% rate enclosed, only for. 

subscriptions of $30 or more) ' 

ALSO, PLEASE SEND A GIFT 
SUBSCRIPTION TO: 

Name '. 

Address ; 

City/State/Zip ; 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: : 

[ ] $30/year Regular ; 

[ ] $15/year Low Income ; 

SEND TO: ] 

P. O. Box 44477 

San Francisco, CA 94144 

FRESNO LISTENERS, : 

SEND TO: '• 

P. 0. Box 881 • 
Fresno, C A 93714 



Greetings Mr. Kirkwood-Yates: 

I am very glad that your interest and concern for the future of 
KPFA's programing prompted you to write to us and express those 
concerns. 

It must be understood at the outset what my intentions are and 
how they concretely relate to the present state and future possibili- 
ties of KPFA. 

Over the past four years our listening audience has dropped from 
87,000 to 59,000, and our subscriber rate Has leveled off at just over 
9,000. For us, this is a very serious situation, especially considering 
the fact that at our highest period we still fell short of the number 
of listeners and subscribers we needed to produce adequate programs 
and prevent deficit budgeting. 

As the Program Director, it is my task to broaden and expand our 
audience as well as increase our total number of subscribers. I believe 
the key to expansion is the creation of a more appealing and popu- 
larly oriented air sound capable of attracting a new habitual listening 
audience while maintaining our current base. It is my goal to increase 
the number of listeners to at least 15,000. 1 believe this can be done 
while maintaining the integrity of our better programs and increasing 
the integrity of those programs which currently lag behind. 

It is true that I intend to condense some of the spoken word pro- 
grams. My emphasis will be on produced half hour and fifteen min- 
ute programs which will be dispersed throughout music programing. 
There will be a one hour block for documentary programs Monday 

! through Friday; a two hour public affairs and news block every 

! weekday evening, with nights devoted primarily to music programing 
with regularly scheduled half hour and fifteen minute public affairs 
and news programs. The music will become more universal, multi- 

! cultural and focused. I intend to eliminate all vocal music which is 

I either racist or sexist unless the presentation is designed to analyse 
the particular shortcoming of the music involved. 

The content and form of all programing will be upgraded-. My con- 
cern is not to eliminate the amount of spoken word programs, but 

' rather to change the mix of all programming so that there are fewer 

', back-to-back spoken words. 

I strongly disagree with you that music is mere entertainment and 

i that information only comes through the spoken word. I do not be- 



lieve that it is that clear cut. What is involved is the quality of both 
the spoken word and music. Music informs through the use of lyrics, 
sound sense manipulations, subliminal suggestions and physical mes- 
sage via sound waves. The human organism receives information in a 
multitude of different ways, to limit that reception exclusively to the 
spoken word is to miss the complexity of the human species. 

I also disagree that feeling good is not an enlightening experience 
because it is a time when we experience the possibility of the joy of 
living and being which I feel is the ultimate purpose for wanting to 
perpetuate life itself. This, however, must be tempered with a real 
concern for an understanding of the forces which prevent us 
from living a euphoric existence. We must not only understand these 
forces, we must actively involve ourselves in a process which will lead 
lead to their obliteration. 

Historically speaking, music has been used in many different ways 
by socialists, communists, anarchists, revolutionaries, fascists, bour- 
geois liberals and various other assortments of people for varying pur- 
poses, to both soothe and stultify as well as excite and activate. To 
merely speak of one functional aspect of music and not the other is 
to only recognize half of the picture. 

The spoken word also has a dual character. We may become in- 
formed through its use. There is also a tendency to substitute act- 
ion with verbiage and understanding with rhetoric. 

It is very important that we look at the total aspect of function- 
ality before drawing firm conclusions. 

I agree with you that music alone will not change the human con- 
dition, neither will words, mass mobilizations, poetry, guns or any 
other one thing in and of itself. We are oppressed spiritually, psycho- 
logically, sexually and in many other non-tangible ways. And I con- 
clude, that the only relief from the multi-level human oppressions we 
all are affected by, in one way or another, and to a lesser or greater 
extent, is to change and mobilize on every human front— politically, 
economically, socially, spiritually, culturally and sexually, without 
making one or the other any less or more important than the other. 

Honestly, 

Roland Young 

KPFA Program Director 



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September 1 9tf 77 KP PA FOL'I'O $ 



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(Fotos by Calvin Roberts) 




,t was only a matter of hours before the eviction would take place. 
Twelve hours of hard speculation had gone by while we checked and rechecked 
indicators coming in from sources throughout city government and the press as 
well as reports from tenant/supporter teams. The "Red Alert" was 
called at 10:15 on August 3rd and the phone tree mobilization began. Finally, 
police and sheriffs units began to move into position on Kearny Street. Several 
thousand supporters made their way to the hotel before the blockades closed off 
the eviction zone. We started broadcasting non-stop at 3:00 a.m., August 4th. In- 
side the I-Hotel, despite the extreme pressure and tension, the tenants and sup- 
porters remained calm and disciplined. Kearny Street was cleared of all onlookers 
by 3:30 a.m., leaving riot-clad police and sheriff units in assault position facing 
approximately 1 ,000 I-Hotel supporters; a well-disciplined solid mass formation 
called the "Human Barricade". Third World News broadcast operations were 
stationed on the third floor of the hotel overlooking the main entrance to the 
building on Kearny Street. Andres Alegria and Don Foster were giving minute- 
by-minute reports while 1 was working my way through the hotel's interior. At 
3:42 a.m. the police "tac" squad, with assistance from the S.F. Fire Department, 
took over the roof and held 20 supporters and several younger tenants. Hidden 
from the eye of the cameras, and deep within police territory, they were hand- 
cuffed and beaten, the last to leave the hotel some five hours later. 

The following is a transcription from the Bureau's live broadcast at that his- 
torical moment when the "tac" squad began the assault on the "Human Barri- 
cade" with horses and clubs. Emile De Gu/man, Chairperson of the Tenants 
Association was in the process of making a statement. 

3:45, Thursday, August 4, 1977. 

Emile: . . . We're doing this knowing what's facing us with the police and 

undersheriffs. I think we're moving with the kind of determination 
to be able to perserve through this, and it's kind of a waiting game. 
They're up there on the roof now, waiting to come down. . . 
(Emile 's voice becomes muffled by chants of supporters, voices sing- 
ing "Freedom Sweet Freedom") 

Andres: The San Francisco 'tac' squad is now moving the people by force 
out of the front of the International Hotel. The 'Human Barricade' 
is now being moved by force. They're using their billy clubs. . . prod- 
ding the crowd. They're directly below me right now. The tactic is. . . 
the S.F. Police Department. ..it looks to me like the tactical squad 
. . . using their billy-clubs to move the 'Human Barricade' out of the 
front of the International Hotel. The 'Human Barricade' ... the peo- 
ple are moving slowly. There is a whole lot of prodding going on. I 
see two officers using their clubs liberally. There is pushing. . . there's 
one supporter of the hotel being crushed against a truck that's parked 
in front of the hotel. He's not resisting. . . he's trying to move. . . 
however, he's being hit. 
(No evictions-We won't move - now being chanted from barricade) 

Norman: (From inside hotel) Are they hurting people, Andres? 

Andres: They're hitting people from the other side. The police units that are 
on horseback are now moving into the crowd and effectively keep- 
ing the crowd on the other side from moving. What's happening is a 
large portion of the crowd in front of the door. . . the door of the 
International Hotel. . . is being squeezed between officers with clubs 



by Norman Jayo of the THIRD WORLD NEWS BUREAU 

on one side and officers on horseback on the other side. There is 
quite a bit of violence happening right now below us here in front of 
the International Hotel. . . they're hurting people. . . 
(Chants become more forceful. 'No evictions - We won't move') 
. . . again the situation is that right now in front of the International 
Hotel. . . the S.F.P.D. units have a large portion of the crowd of sup- 
porters of the hotel trapped inbetween officers with clubs and officers 
on horseback. There is no restraint being used by the police right 
now. Specifically, the police on horseback are liberally. . . 
(A great swell of cheering erupts from the 'Human Barricade') 
... the crowd is cheering right now because the police officers on 
horseback were removed. However, what's happening right now is 
the officers on the other side are being extremely violent. There is-no 
resistance on the part of the people. . . they're peaceful. . . it's very 
ugly. . . the situation is very ugly here at the hotel. A large group of 
supporters massed in front of the I-Hotel are being pushed by force 
by members of the S.F.P.D. . . They're not moving. . . the supporters 
are not moving. . . 

('The people united will never be defeated' now being chanted) 
. . . they're not moving. They're not resisting with any violence. . . 
they're simply holding their position. . . the supporters of the Inter- 
national Hotel. . . The S.F.P.D. officers are using their clubs. . .al- 
though. . . the people aren't moving. . . their clubbing people. . . it's 
actually a pretty incredible scene. . . 

On September 10, 12 noon to 4 p.m., the Third World Bureau will rebroad- 
cast the entire live coverage of the eviction on KPFA. The broadcast is an open 
account of the way in which the police violently carried out the eviction as well 
as the way the tenants and supporters conducted their tactical resistance to save 
the International Hotel for low-income housing. We will begin the rebroadcast - 
with the first live update hours before the eviction. We will end with the reports 
from the Mayor's office, where Moscone accounts for the violence on the part of 
the police. We will also bring you up to date on the tenants' continuing fight with 
the city over reparation damages and the movement to save the International Ho- 
tel's 150 units of low-income housing. 

The Third World News Bureau first broadcast live from the International Hotel 
almost 17 months ago. The first planning meeting was several months before 
that. Since then, we have broadcast live over 60 times, most of which evolved a- 
round the major eviction threats. In the beginning it wasn't clear as to exactly 
how to produce the coverage. Nor were we aware of the full political significance 
of the broadcast and its relationship to the low-income housing movement. Only 
now is the full impact of the eviction coverage beginning to establish clear guide- 
lines for future practice in linking progressive radio journalism to Third World 
People's Struggles. Although the "Red Alert" called on eviction-eve at the Inter- 
national Hotel was a defense tactic in that struggle, it also serves as a strategical 
"Red Alert" to the low-income housing struggles in the Bay Area and across the 
Nation. 

In our case, the Bureau staff must develop creative ways to cover the issues of 
Third World People who are defining and leading the fight against their historical 
oppression, such as the tenants of the I-Hotel. We had to always keep in mind the 
cultural realities of the tenants. (Continued on p. 15) 



6 KPFA FOLIO/September 1977 



[M51QIU5 



070 Pi 5 



ODE TO I 



•Yvette Morris-Anderson 



I don't have a EAR for music 
I feel it in my bones 

I can't have just a taste of bass or saxophone 
I have a heavy jones. 

Took a hard dose of Motown back in '66 

Always! 

Got down to James Brown 

HIT ME! 

wit dat lickin stick! 

Beatle words, bangs, bob 

Backed up the Coasters before I could get a job. 

Moved . . . sang . . . f ingerpopped 
"That child ain't got no sense" 
(Memorized Masekela's cry 

"What a Coincidence" 

Don't want to feel nothing 

cuz nothing is dead 

Man ... a instrument ... on a instrument 

so much more must be said 

So make it funky . . . hard . . . loud 
even freaks draw a crowd. 

While a man in a corner of another time 
he does it mellow 
he knows no rhyme 

He feels me back and makes me free 
it's all for me 

for me! 




MARBLES 

- AN EXCERPT 
FROM THE NOVELETTA 

• by cyn. zarco 



for me! 



(Copyright 1977 by Yvette Morris-Anderson) 



c 




•armen used to play marbles with the boys when she was little so when men 
whistled at her walking down the street she always shouted at them threatening 
them with her fist. 

when. she was 6, she fell in love with eduardo who later turned out to be a drum- 
mer and very good-looking, carmen didn't look so bad either, she had a body 
shaped like a Coca-Cola bottle — the 16 oz. size, and when she walked, people 
would stare out windows. 

carmen drank too much and fell in love too quick, when she was 16, she fell in 
love with this man from roma who used to be a monk, but now he jogs 7 miles 
a day. she wanted to marry him, but he turned out to be homosexual, when she 
was 19, she fell in love with a 38-year-old jazz musician who treated her like a 
goddess, but she soon got tired of him. he walked too slow, years later, he would 
call her on the telephone saying he still had her pictures on the wall and that his 
wife threw dishes at him. carmen shrugged. 

people, she decided, except stone geniuses and great lovers, were generally boring, 
she counted all the geniuses she knew on one hand, carmen had been thinking a- 
bout genius since the day she woke up realizing she was one herself, most geniuses 
have trouble sleeping. 

there's this one poet who sleepwalks all the time then goes back to bed with mud- 
dy shoes, he lives out in the country. 

carmen lives in the city, carmen loves the city, carmen loves rico too. 
rico is loco pero he is not muy rico. you do not have to be rich to be crazy, but it 
helps, most of the people carmen knew who were crazy were poor, maybe being 
poor drove them crazy, or maybe, like carmen's mother says: 

"They Don't Know The Value Of Money" 
what is the value of money? the value of money is that it forces us to think, be- 
fore the concept of money, we were all children. 

especially rico. rico is a bad boy. his parents sent him to catholic school, and he 
pissed in the holy water, he felt like an angel, it reminded him of an italian statue 



(Illustration by Lezley Soar) 

he saw on television of a naked archangel with a jar on his left shoulder standing 
in a fountain. 

rico pisses on the sidewalk now. he is much older and drinks a lot of beer — Dos 
Equis. 

"Uno Dos Equis," he says with dimples in both cheeks and a cleft in his chin, the 
ladies all think he is handsome, and rico knows they do. when they find him alone, 
they stick their tongues out at him and try to take him home, sometimes rico goes 
but this afternoon, carmen is free. 

carmen modpls for an art class at the university, but today they are doing land- 
scapes, she escapes to rico. 

rico plays the saxophone, rico sleeps days and works nights, carmen sleeps nights 
and works days, some nights carmen does not sleep and stays up all night dream- 
ing of rico. rico loves her. he says carmen could fart on her wedding day and still 
be beautiful, 
carmen laughs. 

today she is wearing a dress the color of ripe watermelon, and rico can see her 
shoulders, rico kisses carmen's shoulders, carmen's shoulders become the wings 

of a seagull and take off. 

"i'm gonna marry you, "rico tells carmen, "i'm gonna make you barefoot and preg- 
nant and put you in the kitchen." 
rico is not joking. 

"someday," carmen says and looks far away. 

carmen knows rico is a genius too, so their son would never be a banker, but . . . 
she is thinking of a piano, carmen hears a piano far off and forgets all about rico 
and the baby, carmen hears The Eternal Tune, she mustn't tell a soul, she tells rico 
her period is coming down so she has to go home and change, rico lets her go. he 
can't stand the sight of blood. 

carmen promises rico anything and sucks his lips into hers, she runs all the way 
home. The Eternal Tune ringing in her head. (Copyright 1977 by cyn. zarco) 



September 1977/KPF A FOLIO 7 



KPFA Presents 




Left to Right: Jerry Sager, Jerry Beach, Reginald Lockett. Leigh Lightfoot. Front: Janet Chann & Cyn Zarco. (Foto by Jerry Soger) 



For the past six months, the Folio 
staff has been in the process of creat- 
ing a more viable program guide for 
KPFA listeners and subscribers. In 
doing so, we have added more content 
in terms of articles dealing with up- 
to-date, relevant issues: poetry and 
prose by writers from across the na- 
tion; a regular consumers' column 
Lemon/ Aid by Ken McEldowney; and 
advertisements that we feel would be 
of the most interest to many of our 
readers. 

By giving you four additional 
pages, our goal is to make Folio a 
publication that reaches a wider and 
varied readership with more content 
that is both enlightening and delight- 
ful. We hope to keep you informed 



on KPFA programming in addition 
to contemporary topics and other 
tidbits that may be of special interest 
to our listeners and supporters, be- 
cause it is you who help both the 
station and Folio persevere and 
continue to exist. 

Janet Chann, who has worked on 
the Folio for the past three years, is 
leaving the station. She has done 
almost every job in the department- 
typesetting, selling ads, editing and 
art directing. Janet says, "I have 
learned much and thoroughly enjoyed 
producing the Folio, making it a good 
publication and a good piece of art 
work." She plans to continue her 
studies of Tai Chi Chuan at the Taoist 
Tai Chi Chuan Center in Oakland, in 



addition to her work in graphic de- 
sign. Clown Soup, a block print card 
cooperative, and Animal Crackers, a 
new store opening in Oakland, are 
two of her on-going enterprises. 

Jerry Sager, KPFA's Phone Pro- 
ject Director for the last year and a 
half and Folio Ad Salesperson since 
April, is also leaving the station. For- 
merly with the Bay Guardian where 
he was fired for his union activities, 
he is going to the Berkeley Barb as 
Display Ad Sales Manager. 

Before he came to KPFA to take 
over the duties as Folio Editor, Re 
Reginald Lockett taught English and 
Creative Writing at various commun- 
ity colleges around the Bay Area. He 
is also a poet who has had his poetry 



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Wanted 



Dedicated and talented writers, 
poets, photographers, graphic ' 

artists, paste-up artists, proof- 
readers, typesetters and ad 
salespeople to volunteer their 
work and precious time to 
KPFA's monthly magazine, 
FOLIO. We can't pay you in 
dollar bills, but we guarantee 
your exposure, experience 

and one banana. Give us a 
call at 848-6767 ext. 22 and 
ask for Cyn Zarco (Folio Art 
Director) or Reginald Lockett 
(Folio Editor). 



fBUHniiUlBIVHBUIUBIIIIBIIIBI^IBIIIlBIIHiailllBXIlBlllil 

published in various anthologies and 
magazines. 

Cyn Zarco, our new Art Director, 
is a Pilipina- American poet/journalist 
who's been writing in the Bay Area 
for seven years. Her work has been 
published in Jambalaya: An Antho- 
logy of Four Poets, Yardbird Reader, 
Time To Greez!, The Soho Weekly 
News, and The Miami Phoenix. 

Leigh Lightfoot started working 
with KPFA in promotion and fund- 
raising. She has organized this April 
Marathon/Auction and is presently 
putting together the Bluegrass Auction 
of September 3 and 4. Leigh has been 
the Folio ad saleswoman for the past 
year. In the real world, she is a mo- 
dern dancer/student and participates 
in the theatre of life. 



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September 1977/KPFA FOLIO 9 



Where Have All The Children Gone? 



Haight-Ashbury: Ten Years After 



I first became aware of the Haight-Ashbury as a 
teenager in late 1962 when I started hanging out 
with two cousins who lived with their large family 
up on Frederick near Downey. It was in this district- 
that I really began to take a closer look at San 
Francisco because there was something both thrill- 
ing and fascinating about the atmosphere and the 
structure of the old homes that inspired me as an 
aspiring poet. It was more like being in some fo- 
reign country than just any other neighborhood 
in an American city. This was especially true for 
someone coming from Oakland like myself. From 
that moment until I moved to the outter Richmond 
District in my freshman year at San Francisco 
State, there was nothing that could keep me in the 
East Bay on weekends. Now that I think about it 
some 1 2 years later, I have to admit that it was 
what I saw as an aesthetically beautiful area in an 
equally beautiful city that both encouraged and 
inspired me to choose S.F. State as my first choice 
of colleges rather than because it had, and still has, 
one of the best creative writing programs in the 
country. It was also the multi-cultural aspects of the 
Haight that excited me because this wasn't the ex- 
perience I had had growing up in West Oakland due 
to the well defined racial and class boundaries that 
have always seemed to persist in the psychological 
as well as the mundane sense in that city. These 
are just some of the things that dominated my 
thoughts when it was suggested that we run an arti- 
cle dealing with what people in the Haight are ex- 
periencing and how the area has changed since the 
Flower Movement of the late 4 60's fizzled out like 
so many other artistic, social and political move- 
ments that have been absorbed by history. And 
this is the impression 1 feel anyone familiar with 
that period would more than likely see in the gra- 
ffiti scribled on the wall of the Straight Theater 
which reads, "The Merry Pranksters Are Back! 
1967-77." 

In the process of gathering information for 
this article, I spent a day revisiting the Haight by 
walking and looking at many of the physical changes 
that have taken place in the last 7 or 8 years. One of 



by Reginald Lockett 

the things I noticed is that quite a few of the old bus- 
inesses have been replaced by newer and radically 
different types of shops and stores than those that 
once lined Haight Street between Masonic and Stan- 
yan even in the days of the so-called 'Hippie Move- 
ment.' One liguor store, Benedetti's, which has been 
on Haight Street for years, has moved across the 
street from where it used to be primarily because the 
cost of maintaining a home, apartment or business 
in the Haight-Ashbury has risen dramatically in the 
past six years. Houses and apartment buildings are 
being renovated by both individual owners and real 
estate companies such as Colonial Realty and Sky- 
line Realty. This renovation is one of the factors 
of the rising rental rate; however, the rent of even 
the run-down buildings is still astronomical. Be- 
cause many people can no longer afford to rent 
apartments and flats, the class, racial, social and po- 
litical balance of the area is changing. Many people 
agree that Haight-Ashbury is fast becoming a white 
upper-middle class neighborhood. 

When I visited the People's Media Collective on 
Shrader St., I found out that blacks, other third 
world people, and the elderly are not the only groups 
feeling the effects of the rising cost of living in the 
Haight, but lower middle class families and commun- 
ity oriented groups as well. It seems that many of 
the new owners, some of whom do not live in the 
community, city or even state, are not renting to 
individuals or groups that project anything other 
than the white middle class image. According to 
still another source, one young black woman in the 
lower middle class income bracket was forced to 
move out of an apartment she had rented for several 
years because the new owner doubled the rent. While 
exchanging information with people at the Media 
Collective, who have done extensive interviews and 
studies on Haight, I learned that the thrust of this 
change began in 1 974 when speculators began to give 
many of the buildings higher appraisal values than 
those given by the city. A house that was once ap- 
praised at $19,000 is now appraised at about 
$80,000 without repairs. Apartments that once 
rented for about $180/month now cost $360 to 



$400 to rent. Now, there is a tremendous number 
of vacant apartments in the Haight. 

Bob and Barbara Garner moved to Haight-Ashbury 
five years ago in the wake of the Flower Movement. 
Bob thinks that he and Barbara were fortunate to 
find the house they presently occupy, although he 
does express deep concern for those poor people, 
blacks and other minorities that are systemically 
being moved out of the district because of the high 
rent being charged by many of the new owners. Both 
Bob and Barbara feel that this is no accident since 
money is being made not only in real estate, but in 
the revitalization of Haight Street businesses which, 
as Bob mentions, are becoming more like Clement 
and Union St. businesses. Bob and Barbara both agree 
that low-income, elderly people and minority people 
should become more involved in, or organize, rent 
control in order to reserve some decent priced hous- 
ing for themselves. The Garners believe that it would 
be very unfortunate if the neighborhood was to be- 
come a predominantly white middle-class residential 
and business area. Bob says, "I like it and would like 
to stay if the area remains multi-cultural. I don't 
think I would if the racial and cultural balance is 
upset." He also feels that what is happening in the 
Haight is happening all over San Francisco. 

Unlike the Garners, Percy and Doris Long have 
been in the Haight-Ashbury since 1958. For them, 
the changes in the area have been 'like a fire in the 
wind.' When they first moved on Page Street, the 
Haight was a white middle class neighborhood. The 
Longs only remember one home in the 1 700 block 
of Page being owned by a black family. At that 
particular time many people who lived in the West- 
ern Addition were being served with notices of what 
was to be the beginning of urban renewal, and 
Haight-Ashbury was the practical place to either 
buy or rent because of the low-cost of living. As a 
matter of act, the Haight was then known as the 
Buena Vista District. The Longs remember being 
very pleased with the area because of the conven- 
ient stores on Haight St. and being close to Gol- 
den Gate Park. 

(Continued on p. 15) 










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September '1977-/KPF A POLK) 11 



1 PROGRAM 

LISTINGS 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

Kris Welch's morning show. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 
Labor Day Music I. Music for the birth- 
day of Antonin DVORAK. The folk 
traditions of 19th-century Czechoslovakia 
and America is joined with the learned 
styles of Schumann, Brahms and Wagner. 
Carnal Overture; Moravian vocal duets; Ser- 
enade in D minor. Op. 44; Symphony in G, 
Op. 88 (Vaclav Talich and the Czech Philhar- 
monic); The American Flag Cantata, Op. 
102; Bagatelles with harmonium and other 
chamber music. With Ron Erickson. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

Mortal Lessons: Notes on the Art of Sur- 
gery (1) by Richard Selzer. Selections from 
the remarkable essays by the noted surgeon. 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 ROOTS OF CONSCIOUSNESS 

With Jeffrey Mishlove. 

1:15 THE RISING OF THE MOON 

By Lady Gregory. Lady Augusta Gregory 
was an outstanding example of that not un- 
usual phenomena: An Anglo who decided 
that the English way of life was not as 
'superior' as it had been cracked up to be. 
She became more 'Irish than Irish.' Lady 
Gregory wrote numerous books and plays, 
and was a founding member of the now 
famous Abbey Theatre in Dublin. KPI A 
proudly presents the Berkeley One Acts 
Production, The Rising of the Moon, 
directed by J.D. Trow with Robert Behling, 
John Shea and Q. Lewis as the players. Pro- 
duced by Padregin McGillicuddy. 

2:00 THE IMAGED WORD 

Hiroshi Kashiwagi, author of The Plums 

Can Wait, is Adam David Miller's guest. 

3:00 MUSIC THROUGH THE EARS 

With Jon Longcore. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 

Perspectives on Science with astronomer 
Rick Reis. . . after which Ken McEldowney 
and San Francisco Consumer Action offer 
you some Lemon/ Aid. . . followed by the 
KPFA Calendar of Events. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

7:30 THIRD WORLD COLLAGE 

8:30 BAKKE 

Next month the U.S. Supreme Court will 
decide whether special admissions policies 
for Third World people and women are 
constitutional. If the court says no, it will 
be the beginning of the end for all affirma- 
tive action programs and will signal the 
legalization of discrimination. The Third 
World Bureau examines what the Bakke 
decision means and how people are organ- 
izing to fight it. 

9:30 OPEN AIR 

10:30 BUDCARVS 

OLD RADIO THEATRE 

Red Skelton Show, and Jack Benny. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 



11:45 MUSIC FROM THE 
HEARTS OF SPACE 

With Timitheo and Annamystyg. 

3:00 am SKETCHES IN SOUND 

A retrospective on the music and lyrics of 
Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson. 



FRIDAY 



2 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 

Johannes BRAHMS: Quintet for Strings in 
F, Op. 88, Gahl, viola; Austrian String 
Quartet [Vox SVBX 584 (28)] ; Alvin 
CURRAN: Canti e Vedute del Giardino 
Magnetico, Curran, kalimba. flugelhorn, 
percussion, voice, Synthi I, etc. [Ananda I 
(51)]; Ned ROREM: Book of Hours (1975) 
Dingfleder, flute; Geliot, harp [CRD SD 
362 (20)] . With Charles Amirkhanian. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

Mortal Lessons (2) by Richard Selzer. 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 LUNCH PAIL 
With Mama O'Shea. 

1:00 PEOPLE PLAYING MUSIC 

Live music from Studio C with Gerda Daly. 

2:00 PLANET ON THE TABLE 

'Grounding with Robert Bly.' Lectues and 
readings by Robert Bly recorded last April 
at the Reminding Conference at Dominican 
College in San Rafael. Recorded and pro- 
duced by Alan Soldofsky. (Rebroadcast) 

3:00 TRADITIONAL AMERICAN MUSIC 

Country music with Tom Diamant. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Community Open Air: Philip Maldari inter- 
views Bay Area political and community 
activitist. . . followed by the Weekend 
Calendar of Events. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

7:30 LATIN AMERICA AWAKENS 

8:30 1750 ARCH STREET 
From the 1750 Arch Tape Archives: Middle 
Eastern Music. Ishmael, Kanun ut, zaz; 
Vince Delgado, darbuka. Including Arabic, 
Greek, Egyptian, Armenian and Turkish 
music. Recorded on June 22, 1973. 

10:30 GOON SHOW 
'Under Two Floorboards- A Tale of the 
Legion.' A Beau Geste spoof. Mylos Sonka 
with another episode from the famous com- 
edy series by the BBC with Peter Sellers, 
Spike Milligan and Harry Seacombe. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 CRUISIN* 

With Carl Stolz. 



Bluegrass/ Auction: 
September 3 & 4 

THE CALIFORNIA BLUEGRASS ASSOCIATION (CBA) held its sec 
ond Annual Grass Valley Bluegrass Festival on June 17, 18 and 19 of this 
year. Check highlights for details of the festival. 

The CBA is a non-profit organization dedicated to the promotion and 
preservation of bluegrass and old-time music in Northern California. 

Held at the Nevada County Fairgrounds in Grass Valley (75 acres in 
the pines). The net proceeds of this festival were split evenly among the 
the participating musicians. 

KPFA's Doug Maisel, Warren Van Orden, Ray Edmond, Tony Ferro 
and Susan Kerns were there and recorded the performances on Saturday, 
June 18, and Sunday, June 19. 

HERE IS A LIST OF SOME OF THE AUCTION ITEMS which will be 
available to KPFA listeners during the Bluegrass Weekend of September 
3 and 4: 

1 ) Eye wear and care from the Focal Point in Berkeley. 

2) A place in a workshop given by the Assertive Training Organization 
of S.F. 

3) A pair of Dynaco A-10 Speakers from the Sound Well (List price: 

$1 1 5/pair. Sound Well sells them for $85/pair. To the KPFA auction 
buyer - who knows. 

4) A night for two at the Calistoga Spa, complete with mud bath, sauna, 
and use of the indoor and outdoor mineral pools. 

5) A twin-size, six-drawer chest bed from Designs Plus in San Rafael. 

6) $100 worth of "seconds'' tile from Mclntyre Tile in Healdsburg. 

7) A night for two at the MacCallum House Inn in Mendocino. 

8) A choice of items from the Creekside Nursery in Santa Rosa. 

9) A place in a workshop given by the Biofeedback Center of Oakland. 

10) A night for two at Wilbur Hot Springs. 

11) Sailing on a 54 foot sloop built in 1904 from the Grisette Sailing 
School at the Berkeley Marina. 

12) A3 month membership at the Berkeley YMCA. 

13) Dinner for two at Narsai's Restaurant in Kensington. 

14) Gift Certificates from Peet's Coffee. 

15) A Summit Park knapsac from the Mountain Shop in S.F. 

16) A workshop in Past Lives Recall, given by the Reflexology Institute 
in Mill Valley. 

17) An appointment for a group of up to 15 people, children and adults, 
for the Exploratorium's Tactile Gallery. 

18) A day of sailing for 3-4 people on a Columbia 22 boat given by Jack 
Martin of San Leandro. 

19) A light four-seater airplane ride for 2 or 3 people around the Bay 
Area given by the Afro-Latin Flying Club. 

20) A custom-made futon from the Golden Nagas in S.F. 

21 ) A place in a scuba diving course given by Marin Skin Diving. 

22) A $50 gift certificate from Yarmo, a women's clothing store in the 
East Bay. 

23) A gift certificate from Stapleton's Art in S.F. which stocks art 
and drafting supplies. 

24) A pair of Birkenstock sahdals from Galletti Brother's Shoe Service in 
S.F. 

25) A place in a course on hang-gliding from.Chandelle S.F. Sky Sails in 
Daly City. 

26) Twelve weeks worth of bagels at a dozen/week from Brothers Bagels 
in Berkeley. 

27) A gift certificate from Big Dogma in Berkeley. 

28) Foreign car parts from Mekatron in Berkeley. 

29) Season's Tickets for 2 to the Berkeley Repertory Theater. 

30) A merchandise certificate to Berkeley Arts, the largest art and gra- 
phics supply store in Berkeley. 

31 ) A two-hour session in a Samadhi sensory deprivation tank. 

32) A merchandise certificate from Auro-Mira of Berkeley, which has un- 
usual imports from South India. 

Many dinners for two, camping equipment, massages and other useful 
and/or frivolus donations will be auctioned off to the highest bidder dur- 
ing the Labor Day Weekend. 

On-the-air auctions have developed into an entertaining way for 
KPFA to raise operating funds. Here the listener can obtain some- 
thing that they want or need, sometimes getting a good deal.and 
know that their money is doing two things at once. 






12 KPFA FOLIO/September 1977 



Francisco 



. pages 12-19 




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September 1977/KPFA FOLIO 13 



MONDAY 



5 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

The beginning of another week with Kris 

Welch. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 
John Cage: His Music and Musical Im- 
portance. Undoubtedly the composer of 
the 20th century who has done most to 
change our definition of the word 'music,' 
John Cage celebrates his 65th birthday to- 
day. As a prelude to our Cabrillo Festival 
recordings of his music (to be aired Sep- 
tember 17 and 18), Charles Amirkhanian 
presents a selection of music which will 
attempt to dispel the popular notion that 
Cage's philosophies are more interesting 
than the actual substance of his com- 
positions. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

Ladies Almanac (1). Djuna Barnes wrote 
this almanac for fun in Paris in 1928 with 
a private printing under the pseudonym: 
A Lady of Fashion. She described it as a 
'simple piece of fun.' We hear this week 
the entries for ten months of the almanac- 
read and produced by Mary Flowerpot at 
WBAI in New York. 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 AIN'T I A WOMAN 

1:00 TAKE CONTROL! 

The Berkeley Women's Health Collective 
shares relevant health information with you. 

2:00 BLUE MONDAY 

Avotcja is gone, but the musical folks of 
the P.A. department carry on as best they 
can. The blues are out of the closet and 
what you need to catch them is good ears. 

3:00 TRADITIONAL AMERICAN MUSIC 
Swing is the Thing. Jumpin' Jive & Swing 
Richard Aldrich, hosts. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Open Air and then, at 5.30 Andy Weissman 
opens the phone lines for everyone's car 
problems on Auto-Clinic-Of-The-Air fol- 
lowed by KPFA's Calendar of Events. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

News magazine of the air. 



6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

Listeners' Air Mail. 

7:30 CHINESE YOUTH VOICE 

Social and political events in the U.S. and 
overseas that concern the Asian-American 
community. 

7:30 CSUF WOMEN'S STUDIES COURSE 

Broadcast on KFCF 88.1 FM for listeners 
in the Central San Joaquin Valley. 

8:30 JEAN RITCHIE AT THE 
FREIGHT & SALVAGE 

Reknowned folksinger Jean Ritchie spared 
one night of her spring U.S. concert tour 
for Berkeley. Like old friends meeting, 
Jean tells about music and mountain peo- 
ple and an enthusiastic home audience 
sings along. Recorded by Fran Tornabene 
and Viki Hebert of the Women's Record- 
ing Crew, produced by Fran Tornabene. 

10:00 TAXI DANCING 

What happens when one person's loneliness 
becomes another person's business? In Los 
Angeles, as in other cities, dance halls give 
lonely men a chance to meet women, to 
talk, to play pool, and dance. . . for a 
price: \5<t a minute or 9 bucks an hour. 
In a series of interviews with managers and 
women workers in dance halls, Dennis 
Wilkin goes behind the facade of streamers 
and coloured lights to find out what sort of 
men come to these places, what do they 
want, and how can women work in a place 
where they are continually feeding the 
fantasies of men they don't know. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 RED CRYSTAL 

Tall green trees are in my head, and the 
strong smell of pine goes out through my 
fingertips. Music to the nth power, 
brought to you by Susan Sailow. 

3:00 am BEEDLE UM BUM 

Late night music. 



TUESDAY 



6 




7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 
With Kris Welch. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 

Presented by Lou Judson. 



A 








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11:15 MORNING READING 

Ladies Almanac (2) read and produced by 

Mary Flowerpot. WBAI. 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 READINGS FROM THE 

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD 

1:00 FOLD MUSIC FROM 
NEAR AND FAR OUT 

Gerda Daly presents gems from her collec- 
tion of 78, 33, and 45 cylinder records. All 
countries/all cultures/all eras. 

2:00 OPEN AIR 

A Public Affairs special 

3:00 PASSING THRU 

With Bari Scott. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Soko, or the Marketplace, with health acti- 
vist Muntu . . . followed by Survival Rights 
with John Yellin, by phone from the South- 
land with state aid information (a KPFA 
demonstration of radiotelephone high tech- 
nology), . . and then, the KPFA Events 
Calendar. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 
Prison Issues: Bruce Goldstein talks with 
ex-prisoners about issues inside and out- 
side California' prisons and jails. 

7:30 LIVING ON INDIAN TIME 

8:30 GIMME JOHN FORD 

KPFA film critic, Michael Goodwin, rates 
new movies, celebrates old ones, picks hits 
and interviews Hollywood celebs. Better 
than ever. 

9:00 THE VBIRD HOUR 

This multi-cultural program series features 
Al Young this month. Young, author of' 
Sitting Pretty, just out in paperback, 
creates another hour of poetic readings, 
music and commentary. 

10:30 AIN'T I A WOMAN 

Women and Work. Presentation by members 
of Mothertongue Readers Theater. 
Recorded at KPFA in July. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 PIECES OF DREAMS 

With Andrew White. 

3:00 am SKETCHES IN SOUND 

The exciting, mysterious world of Miles 
Davis, with Klift B. Thomas. 



WEDNESDAY 



7 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

Number 7 and counting. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 

Josef Matthias HAUER: Das Zwoelfton- 
spiel (17 compositions for harpsichord, 
viola, violin, flute, piano four hands, and 
cello in diverse combinations 1947-1956) 
Victor Sokolowski, harpsichord, etc. 
(Austrian Philips 6599 333 (39)1 John 
BLOW: Ode on the Death of Mr. Henry 
Purcell (Dry den) Leonhardt Ensemble 
I ABC Classics 67004 (25)) Johannes 
BRAHMS: Sextet for Strings in G, Op. 36 
Gahl, viola; D. Gahl, cello; Austrian String 
Quartet [Vox SVBX 584 (43)] With 
Charles Amirkhanian. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

Ladies Almanac (3) read by Mary Flowerpot. 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 WORLD MUSICS WITH GARFIAS 

Ethnomusicologist Robert Garfias surveys 
world musics in this series from KRAB in 
Seattle. 

1:00 TELL IT LIKE IT IS 

(Rebroadcast) 

2:00 NEW HORIZONS 
Explorations into the human condition and 
potential. Humanistic perspectives on per- 
sonal growth and social change. Today, we 
present Health and Super-Health with Dr. 
Lee Sannella who talks about sychic, psy- 
chotic and ecstatic states, and researchers 
into the area of health, energy and super- 
health. Michael Toms and Re Couture hosts. 

3:00 REGGAE EXPERIENCE 

Music with Tony Wright. 

5:00 THIRD WORLD NEWS 

Reports on local community issues, nation- 
al and international events that concern 
Third World people. Produced live from 
the Third World News Bureau in the East 
Bay. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

645 BEHIND THE NEWS 

(Continued on p. 14) 



TAOIST 

TAI CHI CHUAN 

CENTER 

GRAND 
OPENING 
CELEBRATION 
Sun. Sep. 11 
2:30 & 7:30 

Seifu Tsuei Wei and his students will be giving a Tai Chi Chuan 
demonstration as introduction of his new studio. Open classes 
will be offerred during the following week. Please come join us. 

5332 College Ave. OAK. 655-6975 




14 KPFA FOLIO/September 1977 



7: JO IRANIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION 

News and analysis of the Persian Gulf region . 
Presented in Farsi. 

7:30 CSUF WOMEN'S STUDIES COURSE 

Broadcast on KFCF 88.1 FM forlisteners 
in the Central San Joaquin Valley. 

8:30 ODE TO GRAVITY 
Kumquat May. An evening of recent re- 
leases and recorded interviews gathered 
over the past year as Charles Amirkhanian 
returns to his bi-weekly program on the 
avant-garde music scene. 

10:00 FRUIT PUNCH 
Gay Men's Radio. A musical extravaganza 
featuring Esmeralda on the role straight 
women play in gay men's culture. Ezzy 
doesn't beat around the bush and smashes 
a few choice myths about "Fag Hags" 
and other terms derogitorily applied to 
women. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 NIGHT KITCHEN 

With Bari Scott. 

3:00 am SKETCHES IN SOUND 

That bad coosome twosome bring you some 
of the best recording from Fantasy Records. 
With Klift B. Thomas and Yolanda D. Smith. 



THURSDAY 




8 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

We're still counting, Kris. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 



Keith Jarrett's composition Ritual will be 
aired on September 17 and 18. 
9:00 MORNING CONCERT 
Labor Day Music II: Western music inten- 
ded for the working class audience and 
performer, by BACH, Frederic RZEWSKI, 

George ANTHE1L (Sonatina), Kurt WEILL, 
Jean WIENER (Concerto for Orchestra 
with Piano), and the Portsmouth Sinfonia. 
Presented by Ron Erickson. 

11:15 MORNING READING 
Ladies Almanac (4). 



featured at the Cabrillo Music Festival 
11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 ROOTS OF CONSCIOUSNESS 

Produced by Jeffrey Mishlove. 

1:15 VISIONARY ART 

Artist Norman Stieglemeyer discusses the 
renewed interest by many young artists in 
Visionary Art, and the work of ten Bay 
Area Visionary artists currently showing 
their work at the Stuart Gallery in Berkeley. 



2:00 THE BEST OF THE COCKETTES 

Genderfuck. the blurring of lines between 
masculine and feminine roles and appear- 
ance of the Cockettes on New Year's Eve, 
1970. What started as amateur theatre 
evolved into a much more polished (and fa- 
mous!) art form by the time they disbanded 
in 1972. We've recorded the best music of 
this period in KPFA's studio and bring it to 
you in a radio program. Produced by Kevin 
Burke. 

3:00 THIN AIRE 

Music with Howard Moscovitz. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
The Science Story produced by science 
editor Laurie Garret, followed by Lemon/ 
Aid - consumer information for merchan- 
dise on the rocks. Then, the Calendar of 
Events. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 
Holes in the News. The Media Alliance 
Panel reviews the U.S. press performance 
over the last few weeks. Hosted by Elsa 
Knight Thompson. 

7:30 ANGELA SPEAKS 

Angela Davis with commentary, analysis 
and phone-ins on 848-4425. 

8:30 OPEN AIR 

A Public Affairs special. 

9:00 CHILEAN RADIO 

Carlos Hagen presents a number of sound 
images and montages to convey the 'sound 
and the message' of Chilean radio before 
and after the fall of President Salvador 
Allende. The result is a striking contrast that 
illustrates the sudden and profound changes 
that took place in Chile's political, cultural 
and musical life. 

(Continued on p. 16.) 



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42 years old. 



September 1977/KPFA FOLIO 15 



I-Hotel . . . 



At first, the tenants couldn't distinguish us from commercial media reporters 
who often depicted them as old people, void of a common culture and history, 
who were living in a fire-trap or a run-down flop house waiting to be demolished. 
Our job was to learn their history as Pilipino and Chinese immigrants, as laborers, 
as organizers and leaders. We had to record and trace their thick accents and na- 
tive languages back through 150 years of Asian will and determination to survive 
in the United States. It was this history, compounded in every generation of op- 
pression that fertilized the last 9 years of struggle at the International Hotel. We 
also had to learn of the housing conditions in San Francisco as well as the city 
politics that are responsible to the issues and, finally, we had to trace the Four 
Seas Investment Corporation back to its Hong Kong base. 

Our most sensitive task was to gain the trust of the tenants and supporters. 
We spent hundreds of hours at the hotel. This was critical inorder to create the 
kind of relationships necessary to penetrate the heart of the struggle. We were 
attempting to brake the wire copy, hit-and-run mentality that prevails in com- 
mercial journalism. This, we are glad to say, we accomplished. For us, the line 
separating us from supporters and tenants confronting the police was often in- 
visible. No one hesitated to speak into our microphones, even when .the police 
were upon them. There were moments when the human compassion almost di- 
sposed of the complicated class formality known as objective journalism. That's 
not to say that we weren't reporting the objective truth. Our only regret stems 
from not being able to capture on tape the transformations of people in the I- 
Hotel Struggle; transformations from the fight for one's home to the spirit of a 
low-income housing movement; transformations that changed personal relation- 
ships in the midst of the struggle, from friend to comrade; transformations seen 
only in the tears and unrecordable last words of those who fought and died along 
the way, like Manong Claudio Domingo; transformations of young white sup- 
porters who learned to follow the Third World leadership of elderly Asians who 
do not speak in the language of the "Left." These are the lessons we regret not 
being able to transmit. 

The most apparent conclusion after listening to the live coverage is that the 
Tenants Association is not dead. Despite the violence of the eviction and the deci- 
mation of the interior of the hotel shortly after the tenants bounced back only 
four hours after the eviction. The Third World News Bureau will continue to co- 
ver the struggle to save the International Hotel for low-income housing. We 
would like to state at this time our sincere thanks to the tenants of the Inter- 
national Hotel for allowing us to be on the inside of their struggle. 

The Third World News Bureau will also be transcribing the complete live 
broadcast for publication and distribution. We welcome any photographs,trans- 
cribing skills and donations of financial aid for this project. If you are aware 
of any grants available for such a project, please inform us as soon as possible. 
You may contact us at the Third World News Bureau, 3201 E. 14th Street, 
Oakland, CA 94601 or call 533-5732. 



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Percy, a construction worker, feels that many of good businesses were ruined 
by the Flower Movement because many of the old shops were replaced by bus- 
inesses that catered exclusively to the trends of the time. His view of that period 
is that it was a movement where young people strived to find themselves and a 
place in this society. Like Bob Garner, he sees the rising cost of housing in the 
Haight as unfortunate and, unlike almost 20 years ago, non-family oriented. His 
wife, Doris, a school teacher, looks at the emergence of new shops, galleries and 
theatre groups as being more of a rebirth because she feels that the excitement 
of the Flower Movement left Haight-Ashbury drained as a place to live and own a 
business. 

What is happening in the Haight is happening all over San Francisco. However, 
in doing some research on the historical background of this area, it was learned 
that Haight-Ashbury was one of the few districts in the city left untouched by 
the earthquake of 1906. This could lead one to wonder why this has become, 
like the outer Mission and Fillmore Districts, a choice place to live for those 
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10:00 BUDCARVSOLD 
RADIO THEATRE 

Part 1- A tribute to the San Francisco 
Opera. Part 2 - The Metropolitan Opera 
presents. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 MUSIC FROM THE 
HEARTS OF SPACE 

With Timitheo and Annamystyq. 

3:00 am SKETCHES IN SOUND 

Klift B. Thomas presents some of those 
fantastic Blue Note Recordings. 



FRIDAY 

9 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 



7:15 AM/FM 
With Kris Welch. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 

Johannes BRAHMS: Quintet for Strings in 
G, Op. Ill Gahl, viola; Austrian String Quar- 
tet'[Vox SVBX 584 (30)] Samuel COLER- 
IDGE-TAYLOR: Hiawatha's Wedding 
Feast; Sargent, Royal Choral Society & 
Philharmonia Orch; Lewis, tenor [EMI 
ASD 467 (32)) MOZART: Concerto for 
Flute and Harp with Orchestra in C, K 299 
Korneev, flute; Erdeli, harp; Barshai, 
Moscow Chamber Orch. [Westminster 
Gold WGS 8334 (25)) Rene BARBIER: 
Quartet for Saxophones Op. 99 ( 1 96 1 ) 
Danneels Quartet [Musica Magna 60 002 
(11)] Ruth Crawford SEEGER: Two 
Movements for Chamber Orchestra (1926) 
Pittman, Boston Musica*Viva [Delos DEL 
25405 (8)] With Charles Amirkhanian. 



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11:15 MORNING READING 
Ladies Almanac (5). 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 LUNCH PAIL 

With Mama O'Shea. Come to Mama and 

1 :00 PEOPLE PLAYING MUSIC 

Live music from our studios presented by 
Gerda Daly. 

2:00 OFF CAMERA 
A behind the scene look at the art and in- 
dustry of film and video. Conversations 
Mark Yacovonne of Pittsburgh. Penn. and 
Bob Artis, author of Bluegrass, the highly 
acclaimed book dealing with the roots and 
history of this traditional style of Ameri- 
can music. 

2:30 UPSTAGED 

Irene Oppenheim with reviews and inter- 



Vl3th year! 

77-78 Fall/Winter Season 



THE PLOUGH AND THE STARS 

by Sean O'Casey 
September IS - October 16 



IN THE JUNGLE OF CITIES 

by Bertoll Brecht 



Oclobor 27 - November 27 



MEDAL OF HONOR RAG 
by Tom Cole 

December 1 - December 18 



GOETHE: EIN FRAGMENT 
by Michael McClure 
January S - February S 




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WRITE OR CALL 

THE JULIAN THEATRE 

Telephone: (415) 647-8098. 

9S3 De Haro Street 
San Francisco. California 94107 



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views in the performing arts. 

3:00 TRADITIONAL AMERICAN MUSIC 
Pig in a Pen. A program of traditional and 
contemporary bluegrass and old-time music 
with Ray Edlund. Today's program brings 
you Part 3 of a four-part series titled, "The 
History of Bluegrass Music" produced by 
Mark Yacovonne of Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania and Bob Artis, author of "Bluegrass", 
the highly acclaimed book dealing with the 
roots and history of this traditional style 
of American music. 

5:00 BEHIND THE NEWS 
Community Open Air: Access for commu- 
nity and political activists . . . then, Diamond 
aad Christine give you their tips for this Fri- 
day Night at the Movies . . . after which 
Philip Maldari gives you the rundown on this 
weekend's Calendar of Events. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

Hosted by Mama O'Shea. 

7:30 LATIN AMERICA AWAKENS 

8:30 1750 ARCH STREET 
From the 1750 Arch Tape Archives. Karl 
Goldstein, pianist. MOZART: 12 variations 
on "Ah, Vous Dirais-je, Maman;" SCHU- 
MANN: Fantasy pieces, Op. 12; BEET- 
HOVEN: Sonata in A, Op. 101; CHOPIN: 
Prelude in A flat. Op. 28, No. I 7; Prelude 
in F sharp minor, Op. 28, No. 8; Barca- 
rolle, Op. 60. Recorded on April 22, 1977. 

10:30 GOON SHOW 
The Tuscan Salami. Mylos Sonka intro- 
duces another from the famous comedy 
series by the BBC with Peter Sellers, Spike 
Milligan and Harry Secombe. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 CRUSIN' TO NEW ORLEANS 

Rock, rhythm & blues with lots of hot 
sauce. Produced by Carl Stolz. 



SATURDAY 



10 



6:00 THE GOSPEL EXPERIENCE 

Traditional and contemporary gospel 
music with Emmit Powell. 

9:00 OLD TIME STORIES/ 
JAIME DE ANGULO 

Continuing our series of Northern California 
Indian tales and songs recorded by Jaime de 
Angulo in 1949. De Angulo knew that the 
Indian's way of life was rapidly disappear- 
ing, and he learned many of the languages, 
stories and songs from old Indian friends. 

10:00 TELL IT LIKE IT IS 

A variety show for young people by the 
students from the Odyssey School 

11:00 FOCUS ON WOMEN COMPOSERS 
Contemporary Collage. Featuring recent 
works by Janet Danielson, Beth Anderson, 
Carolyn Hawley, Suzanne Ciani, Jacqueline 
Fontijn. Produced by April McMahon. 

12:00 STANDBY/ 

LIVE FROM I-HOTEL 

Rebroadcast of the 'Eviction Tapes.' See p. 5 

4:00 THE MOTHERLODE 

Voices of people in struggle . . . blues . . . 
jazz, with Laurie Simms and Judy Gerber. 

6:00 FREEDOM IS A 

CONSTANT STRUGGLE 

7:00 GREAT BLACK MUSIC 
Black music in total with Jerel de Leon 
and Bob Brown. 10:00 In our Backyard: 
The cultural expressions of Third World 



September 1977/KPFA FOLIO 17 



people through music, theatre, art and 
literature. 

1 :00 am DONNEL'S MUSIC THEATRE 

The best in music is what you get - blues 
to jazz and all variations in between. 



SUNDAY 

11 



8:00 BACH CANTATA 

8:30 SLEEPERS! AWAKE 

A bit of Sunday tradition with Bill Sokol. 

11:00 FOLK AND BLUES 

Chris Strachwitz with samples of downhome 
music. 

1:00 SUNDAY OPERA 

The Collector's Adriana, A historical survey 
of Cilea's opera, which opens the San Fran- 
cisco season this month. Caruso, Gigli, 
Pandolfini, DeLuca, etc. Presented by 
Bill Collins. 

2:00 VISIONARY ART 

2:30 PLANET ON THE TABLE 
Homage to Frank O'Hara. Alan Soldofsky 
hosts an hour-long retrospective on poet 
I rank O'Hara's work, with guests Bill 
Berkson, publisher of Big Sky Books, and 
others who knew O'Hara in New York. 
Produced by Alan Soldofsky and Jim 
Nisbet. 

3:30 THROUGH A WOMAN'S EYE 
Karla Tonella visits Eleanor Dickinson, 
artist, writer, teacher who talks about 
artists sharing information and resources, 
arts legislation and artists' survival. 

4:00 THE OPERA REVIEW 

KPI-'A's longest-running seasonal program 
returns with a critique of opening night's 
Adriana Lecouvreur and Mozart's Idomeneo. 

5:00 BLEEKER STREET WEST 

Contemporary folk music. 

6:00 SUNDAY NEWS 

6:30 SOVIET PRESS & PERIODICALS 

William Mandel brings the U.S.S.R. to the 
Bay Area and your comments on 848-4425. 

7:00 ASK YOUR MAMA 

The world of Black music and literature. 
Brock Peters reads the conclusion of 
Richard Wright's Black Boy at 9 p.m. 

10:00 BEYOND THE RIVER 

Last Chants continues with mostly music 
and some legends from the back rooms of 
spaceship Earth, with Jon Longcore. 

1 :00 am STATE OV EMERGENCY/ 
PRISON POETRY 

Human expression. With Max Schwartz. 

2:00 BLUES IN THE NIGHT 

Chris Potter suits your taste. 

MONDAY 



12 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

Ooo-Bop-Pe-Shoo. With Kris Welch. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 

Presented by Bari Scott. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

Fred Cody reads from recent publications. 



11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 AIN'T I A WOMAN! 

Documentaries, interviews, music and 
poetry by, for and about women. 

1:00 TAKE CONTROL! » 

The Berkeley Women's Health Collective 
brings you solid information on health 
maintenance for yourself and your children. 

2:00 AFRO-BLUE 

Music expressed by African and New World 
peoples. Produced by Sandie Agida and 
engineered by Ghana Wilson. 

3:00 TRADITIONAL AMERICAN MUSIC 
Elite Syncopations. Ragtime is usually con- 
sidered music for solo piano or (occasionally) 
for orchestra. This show presents ragtime 
for duos, trios and quartets featuring Eubie 
Blake and others. Joel Sachs hosts. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Labor Commentary with John Burke, leg- 
islative rep. for United Transportation 

Workers Union, Local 3 after which 

Andy's Auto Ginic Of The Air opens up 

followed by the KPFA Calendar of 

Events. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 
6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

7:30 CHINESE YOUTH VOICE 

Social and political events in the U.S. and 
overseas that concern the Asian-American 
Community. 

7:30 CSUF WOMEN'S STUDIES COURSE 

Broadcast on KF.CF 88.1 IM for listeners in 
the Central San Joaquin Valley. 

8:30 WORLD MUS1CMOBILE 

Paul Dresher presents traditional and new 
steel drum music of the Caribbean, with 
special recordings from the collection of 
Andy NareU. steel drum musician 
extraordinaire. 

10:00 THE BEGIN VICTORY 
War Or Peace. The situation in the Middle 
East hangs in delicate balance. The ques- 
tion is whether it will tip towards ano- 
ther Middle East war or peace talks in 
Geneva, and the victory of the Likud 
Party and Menachem Begin could have 
ominous implications for the balance 
of power politics in the Middle East. This 
special news documentary will look at the 
Israeli, Arab, Palestinian, and United 
States' policy positions in this complicated 
political equation. Produced by Stephanie 
Allan and Carl Bloice. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 BLUES BY THE BAY 

With Tom Mazzolini. 

3:00 am BEEDLE UM BUM 

Stay awake or drift off to sleep with Jane 
& Larry, chasing those blue devils away 
with an unpredictable mixture of musical 
styles. 

TUESDAY 



13 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

Look out! It's Tuesday the 13th. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 

Presented by Lou Judson. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

Fred Cody (2). 



12:15 READINGS FROM THE 

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD 

Catherine Webb and Cohorts super-sleuth 
around in the musty backwaters of Capitol 
journalism and retrieve some choice stuff 
CaU-ins at 848-4425. 

1:00 FOLK MUSIC FROM 
NEAR AND FAR OUT 

All countries/all cultures with Gerda Daly. 

2:00 LUNCH AT DELANCY STREET 

John Mahar, his guests and you dine on is- 
sues and answers to provocative questions 
put to people in the public eye. 

3:00 PASSING THRU 

With Bari Scott. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Open Air . . . followed by John Yellin's 
Survival Rights live from lovely Riverside 
and your own home! . . . after which, the 



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Calendar of Events 'til the news. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

Prison Issues: Your host is Bruce Goldstein. 

7:30 LIVING ON INDIAN TIME 

8:30 LITTLE PRESS REVIEW 

Adam David Miller reviews some of the re- 
cent little press publications. 

9:00 BUDCARYS 

OLD RADIO THEATRE 

Lux Radio Theatre "Hello, Frisco, Hello" 
starring Alice Paye. 

10:00 AIN'T I A WOMAN! 

Women's News and Commentary. Followed 

by interviews, music and poetry readings. 

1 1 :00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

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18 KPFA FOLIO/September 1977 



11:45 PIECES OF DREAMS 

With Andrew White. 

3:00 SKETCHES IN SOUND 

WEDNESDAY 



14 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

Hang in there with Kris Welch. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 

Andre-Modeste GRETRY: Symphony No. 
2 in E-flat Koch, Les Solistes de Liege [MHS 
3498 (9)] Antonin DVORAK: Serenade 
in E for Strings, Op. 22 Davis, London Sym 
Orch [Philips 839 706 LY (27)] Paul 
HINDEMITH:.Z-h</us Tonalis, Richard 
Tetley-Kordos, piano solo [Orion ORS 
75189 (58)] G. F. HANDEL: Sonata in B 
for Block flote and Basso continuo; Sonata , 
in B for Oboe and Basso continuo; Sonata 
in F, Op. l.No. 11 for Block flote and Basso 
continuo; Brueggen, blockflote; Bruce 
Haynes, oboe; Bylsma, cello; van Asperen, 
harpsichord [ABC Classics 67005 (21)] 
With Charles Amirkhanian. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

Fred Cody (3) 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 WORLD MUSICS WITH GARFIAS 

Ethnomusicologjst Robert Garfias surveys 
world musics in this series from KRAB in 
Seattle. 

1:00 TELL IT LIKE IT IS 

(Rebroadcast) 

2:00 NEW HORIZONS 
Explorations into the human condition and 
potential. Humanistic perspectives on per- 
sonal growth and social change. Happy New 
Year: with Dr. David Zeller, co-diiector of 
the California Institute of Transpersonal 
Psychology. We will explore the subject of 
Jewish mysticism and the Kabbala. Michael 
Toms and Re Courture hosts. 

3:00 REGGAE EXPERIENCE 

5:00 THIRD WORLD NEWS 

On the events affecting Third World people 
in the state, nation and world. Produced by 
the Third World News Bureau in East Oak- 
land. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

0:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

7:30 IRANIAN STUDENTS' 
ASSOCIATION 

News and analysis of the Persian Gulf 
region. Presented in Farsi. 

7:30 CSUF WOMEN'S STUDIES COURSE 

Broadcast on KFCF 88.1 FM for listeners 
in the Central San Joaquin Valley. 

8:30 MUSIC IN AMERICA 

Down-home music with Chris Strachwitz. 

10:00 FRUITPUNCH 

Moving gaily forward: A radio magazine 

featuring readings from the autobiography 

of Jack Latham and other crimes against 

nature. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 NIGHT KITCHEN 

With Bari Scott. 

3:00 SKETCHES IN SOUND 

With Klift B. Thomas. 




voir which due to the recent drought was the 
closest we could get to a Mohave desert set- 
ting in which the play takes place. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 MUSIC FROM THE 
HEARTS OF SPACE 

With Timitheo and Annamystyq. 

3:00 am SKETCHES IN SOUND 

Another further adventure with Klift and 
Yolanda. 

FRIDAY 



Festac '77 broadcast on the Third World Collage, Thursday 15, 7:30 pm. 



THURSDAY 

15 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

Kris Welch brightens your dial with good 

talking, music and views. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 
Labor Day Music III: Music by Charles 
Seeger. During the Wobblies era this emi- 
nent musicologist changed from composing 
elitist art-music to promoting 'people's 
music' through various governmental and 
academic agencies, which he continues to 
do. A premiere broadcast of the Violin 
Sonata (1906) with songs and music by 
Eisler, Riegger and Ruth Crawford. Pre- 
sented by Ron Erickson. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

The Snake. John Steinbeck reads his own 
short story. 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 ROOTS OF CONSCIOUSNESS 

With Jeffrey Mishlove. 

1:15 OPEN HOUR 
A D&L timeslot. 

2:00 GOVERNMENT AND THE ARTIST 

Robert Rauschenberg was in San Francisco 
recently with an wxhibition of his works 
at the San Francisco Museum of Modern 
Art and also to help set up Change, Inc. 
(West), a non-profit organization that pro* 
vides emergency funding for needy artists. 
While he was here, he participated in a 
panel discussion of the California Artist 
Resale Rights law with State Senator 
Alan Sieroty and professors John Merry- 
man and Albert Elsen of Stanford, its two 
most vocal critics. This is a recording of a 
portion of the panel discussion. 



3:00 MUSIC THRU THE EARS 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 

Perspectives on Science with Rick Reis . . . 
after which Ken McEldowney and S.F. Con- 
sumer Action provide you with consumer 
information in the form of Lemon/ Aid . . . 
followed by the KPFA Events Calendar. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

7:30 THIRD WORLD COLLAGE 

Festac '77 was the Second World Black and 
African Festival of Arts and Culture held in 
Lagos Nigeria from January 15 to February 
9, 1977. Over 15,000 Black artists from 
around the world assembled for the largest ex- 
change of cultural values ever to take place on 
the African continent. The opening ceremony 
was attended by 60,000 people and it was 
estimated that more than a million witnessed 
Festac '77. However the event was for the 
most part ignored by the Western media. 
This program, produced by the Third World 
News Bureau at this late date brings you an 
offering of some of the ait presented and a 
political analysis of the impact of Festac '77. 
and a political analysis of the impact of 
Festac* 77. 

8:30 FOUR YEARS AFTER THE COUP 
Chile in Exile. What happens to the refu- 
gees from fascism who settle in the United 
States? The Third World Bureau looks at 
Chilean and other Latin American political 
exile communities in the Bay Area. 

9:30 OPEN AIR 

A Public Affairs special. 

10:00 THE ARTIST OF THE OBSCENE 
By Drury Pifer. The play was written for 
the KPFA Radio Arts Project under a grant 
from the National Endowment for the 
Arts. Gail Chugg and Erik Bauersfeld are 
heard as the two characters in the play; 
technical production by Randy Thorn. 
The entire play was recorded with the 
permission of the Marin Municipal Water 
District, at the bottom of the Nicasio Reser- 



16 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

The end of another week. Refreshing! 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 

Colin McPHEE: Tabuh-Tabuhan (Toccata 
for Orchestra, 1936) Hanson, Eastman- 
Rochester Sym Orch [Mercury SR 90103 
(16)] Howard HANSON: Lament for 
Beowulf; Eastman School Chorus; Hanson, 
Eastman-Rochester Orch [Mercury SRI 0103 
75007 (18)] Howard HANSON: Sym- 
phony No. 3 (1936-7); Hanson, Eastman- 
Rochester Orch [Mercury SR 90449 
(34)] Charles KOECH LIN: Les Bandar- 
Log, Op. 1 76; Dorati, BBC Sym Orch 
[Angel S36295 (16)] Howard HANSON: 
Symphony No. 2, "Romantic"; Hanson, 
Eastman-Rochester Orch [Mercury SRI 
75007 (29)]. With Charles Amirkhanian. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 LUNCH PAIL 

With Mama O'Shea. Come to Mama and 
all sorts of goodies await you. 

1:00 PEOPLE PLAYING MUSIC 

Live music from our studios presented by 
Gerda Daly. 

2:00 The VBIRDHOUR 
(Rebroadcast) 

3:00 TRADITIONAL AMERICAN MUSIC 

Country music hosted by Tom Diamant. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Community Open Air: Philip Maldari inter- 
views Bay Area political and community 
activists. Followed by the Weekend 
Calendar of Events. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

Your host is Mama O'Shea. 

7:30 LATIN AMERICA AWAKENS 

8:30 1750 ARCH STREET 
From the 1750 Arch Tape Archives. Ex- 
cerpts from live electronic concerts held 
at 1750 Arch over the years. Hos Don 
Buchla will annotate and play selections 
including works by Charles Amirkhanian, 
Charles Dodge, Daniel Lentz, Charles 
MacDermed, J.B. Floyd and David Rosen- 
boon. 

10:30 GOON SHOW 
The Telephone. Mylos Sonka introduces 
another from the famous comedy series 
by the BBC with Peter Sellers, Spike Mil- 
ligan and Harry Seoombe. 

11:00 KPFA LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 CRUISIISP 

With Carl Stolz. 



September 1977/KPFA FOLIO 19 



17 Catrill. 



o 



18 



Music Festival 



This Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 17 and 18, from 8:00 — 1:00 a.m., 
Charles Amirkhanian will present two solid days of music recorded 
live at the fifteenth annual CABRILLO MUSIC FESTIVAL, Held August 
18—38 in Aptos, California. In the event that there is not enough time 
in which to present all of this wonderful music, more will be presented 
on Wednesday, September 22 on the Morning Concert. (Saturday, The 
Gospel Experience will be heard from 6:00 am — 8:00 am, and the regu- 
lar late night programs will be broadcast.) 



PRELUDE CONCERT 

Guest Composer-in-Residence: John Cage. 
Soloists: Dennis Russell Davies, Piano and 
Romuald Tecco, Violin. BEETHOVEN: 
Quintet for Piano and Winds, Op. 16; John 
CAGE : Music for Wind Instruments; John 
CAGE: Six Melodies for Violin and Piano; 
Claude DEBUSSY: Sonata, Violin and Piano; 
Keith JARRETT: Ritual, piano. 

STRAIGHT FLUSH: NEW TAPES/FILMS/ 
DANCES 

Coordinator: Charles Amirkhanian. 
Margaret IISHER: Navaho Horn Posture 
(Environmental sound piece for twenty 
dancer/musicians, 1977) World Premiere; 
Lars-Gunnar BODIN: Prolog (1975/76 
tape) West Coast Premiere; Ake HODELL: 
Mr. Smith in Rhodesia (1971, tape); Nancy 
KARP: Three Dances (Apace; Jumping 
Phase; Stamping Piece-in which the dan- 
cers create the sounds for each piece) 
(1975, 1976, 1977); Laurie ANDERSON: 
Three Tape Works (New York Social Life; 
It's Not the Bullet that Kills You, It's the 
Hole; Time to Go; 1976) West Coast Prem- 
iere; Bernard HEIDS1ECK: La Pointcon- 
neuse (Passe-Partout No. 2, 1968, tape) 
West Coast Premiere; Erik SAT1E: Gnos- 
sienne No. 5 (1889) (Solo piano); Larry 
WENDT: The Triumph of Time, after 
Swinburne (1976, tape) World Premiere; 
Keith JARRETT: Hymn of Remembrance 
for Organ ( 1 976, tape); Agnes Martin 
You're a Wonderful Painter (Film, 1975; 
music by Charles Amirkhanian) West Coast 
Premiere, produced by Molly Davies; 
BRAHMS: Intermezzo in E-flat Major, Op. 
117, No. I, (1892) (Solo piano); La Pink 
Grapefruit (A film about painter Salvador 
Dali; music by Charles Amirkhanian, 1976) 
Lawrence Halprin/Roundhouse Produc- 
tions; Annea LOCKWOOD: Deep Dream 
Dive (Theatre piece for electrified string 
player. 1972); Allen STRANGE: Moon 
Plus Moon, live electronic ensemble (1975; 
augmented version with three strings, 
1977) World Premiere. 

ORCHESTRA CONCERT 

Guest Conductor: Gerhard Samuel; Soloist: 
Kenneth Harrison, Viola. VIVALDI: Sea- 
sons "Winter"; BEETHOVEN: Symphony 
No. 2; CAGE: Seasons; Gerhard SAMUEL: 
Work for viola and orchestra, World Prem- 
iere, commissioned by Kenneth Harrison 
for the 15th Festival Anniversary. 

DUCK ISLAND FREE CONCERT 

Conductor: Kenneth Harrison. Charles 
IVES: From the Steeples and the Moun- 
tains; Henry BRANT: Fourth Millenium; 
John CAGE/Lou HARRISON: Double 
Music for Percussion; STRAVINSKY: 
Symphonies of Wind Instruments; CAGE: 
Third Construction for Percussion Quartet; 
BEETHOVEN: Octet Rondino. 

CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT 

Conductor/Pianist: Dennis Russell Davies; 
Soloist: Janos Starker. Cello. BEETHOVEN: 
Cello Sonata in g minor, Op. 5, No. 2; 



DEBUSSY: Cello Sonata; Lou HARRISON: 
Suite for Violin, Piano and Small Orchestra; 
Felix MENDELSSOHN: Octet. 

AFTERNOON CHAMBER CONCERT 

Conductor: Kenneth Harrison. Soloist: 
Janis Hardy, Soprano. DEBUSSY: Sonata, 
viola, flute and harp; STRAVINSKY: 
Symphonies of Wind Instruments; BEET- 
HOVEN: Octet Rondino; Manuel de 
FALLA: Psyche for Flute, Harp, Violin, 
Viola, Cello and Voice. 

SATIE/CAGE 

Conductor/Pianist: Dennis Russell Davies. 
Sololist: Janis Hardy, Soprano. Erik SATIE: 
Socrate; SATIE: Entr'act, 2 pianos and 
silent film (Marcel Duchamp); John CAGE: 
Cheap Imitation (Based on Socrate). 

ORCHESTRA CONCERT 

Guest Conductor: Stanislaw Skrowaczew- 
ski. Stanislaw SKROWACZEWSKI: Music . 
at Night, West Coast Premiere; BEETHO- 
VEN: Symphony No. 3 'Eroica'. 

AFTERNOON ORGAN CONCERT 

Soloist: Anthony Newman, Organ. 
ALL BACH CONCERT: Prelude and 
Fugue in e minor 'Wedge,' All Glory to 
God on High, Toccata and Fugue in F 
Major, Prelude and Fugue in a minor, The 
Savior of the Gentiles, Trio Sonata No. 6 
in G Major, Fantasie and Fugue in g minor. 

ONLY THE LONELY: Music of the Ex- 
perimental Tradition. Coordinator: Charles 
Amirkhanian. Johanna M. BEYER: Music 
of the Spheres, three electrical instruments 
and percussion (1938) World Premiere; 
BEYER: Three Movements, percussion 
(Restless, Endless, Tactless; dedicated to 
John Cage, 1939);Conlon NANCARROW: 
Studies for Player Piano (Tape); CAGE: 
Quartets for 4 1 Players (1977) World 
Premiere; Peter GARLAND: Obstacles of 
Sleep, two sirens, ratchet, lion's roar, pic- 
colo and piano (1973), World Premiere; 
GARLAND: Three Songs of Mad Coyote, 
two pianos and percussion (1 973), West 
Coast Premiere; Colin McPHEE: Four 
Iroquois Dances, chamber orchestra (1945) 
West Coast Premiere. 

SAN JUAN FIESTA DAY 

Masterworks Chorale of the College of San 
Mateo, Galen Marshall, Director. 
Claudio MONTEVERDI: Magnificat; BACH: 
Motet V 'Komm, Jesu, Komm;' Richard 
FELICIANO: Three Madrigals from 
Shakespeare; Goffredo PETRASSI: Non- 
sense. 

Janis Hardy, Soprano. Manuel de FALLA: 
Psyche for Flute, Harp, Violin, Viola, Cello 
and Voice; Dominic ARGENTO: From the 
Diary of Virginia Woolf, piano and voice. 

EVENING CONCERT 

Conductor: Dennis Russell Davies, Master- 
works Chorale of the College of San Mateo. 
Erik SATIE: Gymnopedies; Anthony 
NEWMAN: Orchestra Cycle; BEETHOVEN: 
Mass in C Major, Op. 86. 



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September 1977/KPFA FOLIO 21 



MONDAY 

19 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

Beginning of the week cheer with Kris 

Welch. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 

With Bari Scott. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

"The House of the Solitary Maggot" (I) 
James Purdy reads his novel about a very 
strong woman who refused to marry but 
had three sons; and about a silent Film star 
of the 1920s and his two illegitimate bro- 
ther*. This novel is a great recreation of 
popular American speech of that time. 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 AIN'T I A WOMAN! 

Documentaries, interviews, music and 
poetry by, for and about women. 

1:00 TAKE CONTROL 

The Berkeley Women's Health Collective 
shares relevant health information with you. 

2:00 BLUE MONDAY 

Avotcja is gone, but the musical folks of 
the P.A. department carry on as best they 
can. 

3:00 TRADITIONAL AMERICAN MUSIC 

Tom Mazzolini plays new releases of 
country blues with live guests and inter- 
views. 



5.00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Yvonne Golden and Guests . . . followed by 
the Auto Clinic Of the Air . . . and the Calen- 
dar of Events 'til newstime. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

7:30 CHINESE YOUTH VOICE 

7:30 CSUF WOMEN'S STUDIES COURSE 

Broadcast on K.FCF 88.1 FM for listeners in 
the Central San Joaquin Valley. 

8:30 WORLD MUSICMOB1LE 
EAR TO THE GROUND 

Street Music: songs and dances, ring 
shouts and hollers by professional musicians 
whose world is a stage. Featuring Griot 
music from north Africa, Jogi and Langa 
music from Rajasthan and Sind, Tinker 
music from Ireland, flutes, drums, and tam- 
bourines. Presented by David Roach. 

10:00 JUST LIKE A MAN 
In this first hour of a two-part series at 
this time, men recall the ways in which then 
attitudes towards women were formed by 
family, school, church, Little League, etc. 
Illustrated with music and other pop cul- 
ture trimmings, this program should make 
us think a bit about where we are coming 
from. Produced by the People's Media Col- 
lective/Haight-Ashbury Community Radio. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 RED CRYSTAL 

Tall green trees are in my head, and the 
strong smell of pine goes out through my 
fingertips. Music to the Nth Power, 
brought to you by Susan Sailow. 

3:00 am BEEDLE UM BUM 

From the 20's to the 70's from blues to 
bluegrass, from Berkeley to Hunza - Jane 
& Larry explore the universal language of 
music. 







(Compliments of Dark Carnival) 



Artoo-Detoo and See-Threepio on Tatooine. 

(The following articles are personal comments on the hyperspace fantasy "STAR WARS".) 



Star Wars is quite a phenomenon. It has received some 
of the finest reviews of any movie in the history of the 
American cinema (though now the revisionists have be- 
gun their dirty work— see other article). And the film 
does generally live up to its notices. Viewers are unlikely 
to be disappointed. 

The special effects are light years ahead of anything 
else previously seen on the screen. The editing is fast- 
paced and leaves you breathless. All the production values 
are classy. The acting, however, is basically nonexistent 
with the possible exception of Alec Guiness as the Gandalf 
of the piece. A little trivia here— Carrie Fisher, who plays 
the Princess Leia Organa, is in real life the daughter of 
Eddie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds. She has apparently 
also picked up their combined acting ability— she's dread- 
ful. 

The film is extremely funny and much of it (if not all 
of it) is not meant to be taken seriously. Both plotting 
and dialogue are basic good/evil Flash Gordon space opera. 

But, as one Berkeley bookseller recently pointed out, 
the film in the long run could have a negative side effect. 
Science fiction, as a genre, is far more than simplistic 
space opera, and the success of this kind of simple- 
minded plotting could very well destroy the market for 
more serious work. Most publishers are already hesitant 
about science fiction that makes a point, and the resultant 
glut of space opera (for success spawns imitation) could 
wind up leaving many important writers out in the cold. 

On the other hand, as a local author Richard Lupoff, 
recently intimated, Star Wars could have the opposite 
effect. It could open the field to a new generation of 
readers who may start by being weaned on space opera 
and then, as they grow and mature, move on to more 
sophisticated fare. Thus, Star Wars could, in the end, 
be the best thing to happen to science fiction since the 
days of the pulp magazine. -^ . 

Richard Wolinsky is a film buff, sci fi fan, freelance writer, 
and works with the Promotion department here at KPFA. 



Star Wars had all the gimmicks that would make a 
best-selling movie which, of course, is what it is. The 
new technology for film-making is fantastic. The edit- 
ing is quick and moving. The liberal line is straight. 
The enjoyment level is high-it is pure enjoyment which 
is to say, that it has the same appeal as a comic book. 

So why am I turned off by the movie? I think the 
liberal line that it takes is not so forward-moving. In 
fact, it just maintains old thinking while using new ideas. 
The outer space scenes reeked of such reality that it is 
just a hop, skip and a jump before we ordinary men and 
women can jump through hyperspace, reach the speed 
of light, and journey to the nearest bar five light years 
away. The heroine is liberated, but can still adopt the 
sexually-tantalizing pose when she is rescued from her 
prison cell. Even in all the excitment, the same old ideas 
are perpetuated. 

I have seen the same movie hundreds of times. There 
are war movies with the same five pilots in their cock- 
pits flying in formation toward their secret mission ex- 
plosion-the ultimate orgasm. I have seen love stories 
with the same two men-an idealistic youth and a 
sourly experienced MAN-vie for the desires of the same 
woman (though she is liberated— what a woman!) 

It leaves the nagging feeling that even with all of our 
exciting advances in technology, with all the possibilities 
of outer space/other worlds, we will still assert ourselves 
in the same obnoxious manner, proceeding out of in- 
security and fear thereby using the biggest and baddest 
weapons to show just how strong we are. 

If the movie is not taken seriously (which I have 
taken seriously to extreme perhaps) and treated as a 
comic book, it is thoroughly entertaining. But enter- 
tainment is not what we need to do with all our new 
scientific and technological research. What we do need 
is technocrats with good ideas/a populace with good 
ideas, and some forward-thinking, please. ^ 

Janet Chann is a freelance writer interested in new models for 
existence. She is leaving the Folio after working for three years. 



22 KPFA FOLIO/September 1977 






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••••••••••* 



Cituation for Tigers 



Baby, 
Sum 



Rain 
Gotta 



a 



by Buriel Clay 



What you say? You say I wouldn't understand decent things 
like wanting a good man. I understand. I understand. I understand 
better than you, better than you can ever know. . . You've got 
your babies, I don't. I understand alright. I understand the last 
man that made me a big promise like that. . . marriage, the whole 
deal. So I go and get pregnant for him. For him mind you. And 
we still ain't married. I ask him, "When are we gone get married?" 

He says, "Just hold your horses baby, we gone do it. believe 
me, we gone do it." I'm ten weeks gone by now and my agent 
calls. . . by this time I'm beginning to like the idea of a little hu- 
man growing inside of me. So my agent says he has this part for 
me that calls for a slim high yellow girl, a co-starring role. And 
there I am with this baby inside me which I've begun to love. 

I understand. So, I ask him again, when we gone get married, 
he says, "He'll think about it!" I think about my agent, the baby 
in my womb, the role that I've been waiting for all these years and 
this nigger says, "He'll think about it!" Can you imagine that, 
"He'll think about it.'* So I say, I'll get rid of the baby. And he 
says, "Yes, pour water down my back and tell me it's raining. . ." 
Just think, I believed in this man. 

I loved him and he says that about his baby. And I knew how 
much he really wanted that baby, too. Why did he say something 
like that to me, huh? Why did he say something like that to me? 
I swear, I had never hurt him. Why would he want to hurt me like 
that? Didn't he know what he was saying. . . what he was driving 
me to do? 

I understand that I was nineteen years old, didn't know any- 
thing about life except I love this guy, been acting since I was 
twelve at parochial school in Brooklyn. . . all I wanted was to 
marry this guy and become a movie star. . . Daddy never treated 
Mom like that. I never saw him hit her, except for that one time. 
And I ran away from home and haven't been back since. I lost all 
my faith in Dad that day. I understand. 

How does a man know what it feels-like huh? How does he 
know what it's like to have a wonderful life building inside you 
one minute and the next minute feel an ice cold hanger force it's 
way inside you like someone stuffing crushed glass into your 
womb. Then savagely rip and tear a totally unprotected little hu- 
man away from its nesting place. And empty it into a toilet stool. 

A man could never understand that. I know he couldn't, 
otherwise he never would have said that to me. What does he know 
about hemmorhaging until you start to feel cold all over, wanting 
to stop it but you can't. What does he know about that feeling? 

The doctor told me I'd have to stay in the hospital for five 
weeks. The movie started shooting in three. . . He came to see me 
twice. You know the first thing he asked me? Not how you feeling. 
Is there anything he could do for me? He asked me, "Why did you 
do it? Why did I kill his son. . ." Men just don't know the pain 
they create. I'm laying there barren, empty as some ice glacier in 
Alaska or somewhere, and he says that to me. Doesn't he realize 
even if I wanted to give him another baby I never would be able 
too. . . I understand. I understand them better than you could ever 
dream I do. You got your babies. I don't and never will. . . 

( Buriel Clay II, an instructor of creative writing at San Francisco 
State University, is the author of CITUATION FOR TIGERS, a 
forthcoming book of poetry and prose from Amarillo Press. He 
edited Time To Greez, a third world anthology and is the co-founder 
and artistic director of the San Francisco Black Writer's Workshop. ) 



September 1977/KPFA FOLIO '23 



TUESDAY 

20 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 
With Kris Welch 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 

With Lou Judson. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

The Mouse of the Solitary Maggot (2). 
James Purdy reads his novel. (See listing 
9/19) 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 READINGS FROM THE 

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD 

1:00 FOLK MUSIC FROM 
NEAR AND FAR OUT 

Gerda Daly presents gems from her collec- 
tion of 78, 33 and 45 cylinder records. 

2:00 OPEN AIR 

A public affairs special. 

3:00 PASSING THRU 

With Ban Scott. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Soko, or the Marketplace with health acti- 
vist Muntu . . . followed by Survival Rights 
with John Yellin on a phone hook-up from 
Los Angeles with advice on how to deal with 
bureaucracy . . . and then, the Calendar of 
Events. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6.45 BEHIND THE NEWS 
Prison Issues with Bruce Goldstein who lets 
you know what is going on inside and out- 
side the walls of California's penal institutions. 

7:30 LIVING ON INDIAN TIME 

Presents a Native American perspective 
on many issues weekly. Information, 
music and poetry by Native people for 
all people. 

8:30 GIMME JOHN FORD 

KPFA critic, Michael Goodwin, rates new 
movies, celebrates old ones, picks hits and 
interviews Hollywood celebs. Better than 




Esmeralda 

9:00 THE THEATER AND 

MUSIC OF ESMERALDA 

A musical extravaganza dealing with the ways 
women and men cope with men. Esmeralda 
recorded some of hor songs at KPFA and to- 
night you will hear, "Where Does Love Live," 
"Hot Nights, Cold Mornings," "Men." She 
will be here live to introduce her songs and 
to talk about her life and work with KPFA's 
Kevin Burke. 

10:00 AIN'T I A WOMAN! 

Women's News and Commentary. Followed 

by interviews, music and poetry readings. 




10:30 CHANGING DIRECTIONS: 

A FEMINIST RADIO SOAP OPERA 

Tonight begins the first episode of Changing 
Directions: A Feminist Radio Soap Opera. 
(See Folio Highlights) 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 PIECES OF DREAMS 

With Andrew White. 

3:00 SKETCHES IN SOUND 

Climb aboard the Soul Trane when Klift 
brings you three days of the music of John 
Coltrane. 



WEDNESDAY 

21 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM ^^ 

What's going to happen now? 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 
1977 Cabrillo Music Festival. Charles 
Amirkhanian introduces a program (to be 
announced) from the '77 Cabrillo Music 
Festival which was not previously broad- 
cast. 

1:15 MORNING READING 

The House of the Solitary Maggot (3) 

James Purdy reads his novel. (See listing 9/19). 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 WORLD MUSICS WITH GARFIAS 

Ethnomusicologist Robert Garfias surveys 
world music in this series from KRAB in 
Seattle. 

1:00 TELL IT LIKE IT IS 

(Rebroadcast) 

2:00 NEW HORIZONS: Explorations into 
the human condition and potential - 

Human perspectives on personal growth 
and social change. Moria Noonan, Artist, 
Woman's Group Facilitator talks about 
ways women block their experience of 
being powerful. Moria also will talk 
about how women's consciousness and 
the manifestation of its power is critical 
to the transformation of the planet. 
Viichael Toms and Re Couture hosts. I 

3:00 REGGAE EXPERIENCE 

Music and News with Ralph Miller. 

5:00 THIRD WORLD NEWS 

A magazine of information, music and 
announcements about issues and events 
of concern to Third World communities. 
A new addition to our format is Body 
and Soul, views and news about health. 
Produced live from the Third World 
News Bureau in Oakland. 

(Continued on page 25) 



If I were the wind . . . 



by Bob Cunningham 



I wish I were the wind. I'd storm up to your pad, I'd knock on your door 

and rattle your windows. I'd howl and whistle, then I'd huff and I'd puff 

and I'd blow your house down. 

If I were the wind, I'd become a twirling tornado. I'd rush up and put my 

arms around you and I'd hum the sweetest sounds you've ever heard. Then 

we would dance high above the crowds in the market place so that all could 

see but none could touch. We would spin and sway to and fro like a palm 

caught in the trade winds. 
If I were the wind, I'd become a raging hurricane. And sweep you off your 

feet and we could sail off across the seas to ancient lands of yesterdays. 
There we would tour enchanted cities. There we would be greeted by gurus, 
blessed by bishops, anointed by angels, married by monks, prayed for by 
high priests and damned by devils and demons. Then we would levitate off 
into the ethers stopping on Venus for a honeymoon. 

If I were the wind, I'd become hot like the scorching air of the Sahara desert.. 
I'd get all in your hair, your nostrils, and between the cracks of your tender 
toes. I'd roast you and toast you until you were golden brown, like southern 
fried, finger lickin' good. In desperation for a cool breeze you'd fling your 
garments to the wind. 

If I were the wind, I'd become soothing like a cool Jamaican breeze and dry 
each droplet of sweet perspiration from your delectable body. Being air I 
would take you shape, engulf you, mold myself to your every curve, your 
every indentation. I would massage each and every muscle, calming each 
and every nerve. 

If I were the wind, I'd blow out the light of the sun, sweep the clouds away 
from the moon so that its rays may illuminate your volcanic mountains, your 
lush pastures and the heavenly nectars that flow from the ripe valleys of 
your fruitful body. Then I'd whisper softly in your ear I'd tell you "I love 
*you, I need you desperately, my existence is a meaningless vacuum without 
you." 

If I were the wind, softly I'd soothe and caress you with warm breath until 
you felt good all over. Then I'd pucker up my lips and gently kiss you from 
head to toe, 360 degrees, I would reach total harmony with your nature. 
You'd pant and sing love's sweet song of passion. 



If I were the wind, you'd leave me breathless. 



(Copyright 1977 by Bob Cunningham) 



(Bob Cunningham is the bassplayer for the Yusef Lateef quartet. "If I were the wind ..' 
is an extrapolation of a work by Ahmasi entitled "I Water of Your Bath".) 




24 KPFA FOLIO/September 1977 



**********^*************************** W¥¥¥¥¥ 



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DO YOU CARE ENOUGH 

ABOUT THE NEUTRON BOMB 

TO SPEND 5 MINUTES AND 13 C 

TO STOP F 11 "* 



302872 CAN 492*0095 OMV JAN78 



JAW****** 
*M* WWHWfc AVE 



"Either we humans 
abolish nuclear weapons or 
they will abolish us. 

We do not have much 
time. We can not waste it 
any longer going in the 
wrong directions, adding new 
weapons like the cruise mis- 
sle — which would make in- 
spected mutual reductions 
almost impossible — or the 
neutron bomb — which 
would most likely be the first 
nuclear weapon to be used 
since Nagasaki, thus trigger- 
ing the use of others. 

By stopping these pro- 
grams of destruction now, we 
will buy time which we must 
use to save ourselves and 
future generations.*' 

- Daniel Ellsberg 

A National Mobilization 
Against Nuclear Madness 

The Neutron Bomb re- 
minds us anew of the mad- 
ness of nuclear stockpiling. 
For information on what you 
can do to help rid our world 
of ALL nuclear weapons, 
write: 

Campaign to Abolish 
Nuclear Weapons 
1360 Howard Street, San 
Francisco, CA 94103 

— or — 
Mobilization for Survival 
1213 Race Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19107 




OB 



CA 9H18 



Y 



ou've probably heard about the Neu- 
tron Bomb — the "people-killer" — 
that President Carter wants to add to 
the U.S. nuclear arsenal. And, like millions 
of other Americans, you were probably appal- 
led that your tax dollars were being spent on 
such a brutal, inhuman weapon. 

We don't have to just sit back and let 
the government commit another atrocity in 
our name. Public outcry stopped the ABM, 
the SST and the B-l. We can do the same for 
the Neutron Bomb. We can't afford not to. 

Take five minutes and write to the Presi- 
dent. Urge him to cancel development of the 
Neutron Bomb. Attach a 13(Z stamp and mail 
it to the White House, Washington, D.C. 
20500. Tell your friends about the issue and 
urge them to write, too. Show them this 
message if they haven't already seen it. 

This is the first time in our history that 
we, the American people, have had the oppor- 
tunity to stop a new nuclear weapon before it 
is deployed. And never before has it been so 
urgent that a weapon be stopped. We cannot 
abdicate our moral responsibility. 

If you care, please find a pen and a 
piece of paper NOW and write to President 
Carter. Tell him to STOP THE PEOPLE- 
KILLER — STOP THE NEUTRON BOMB! 

Sponsored by The Neutron Bomb Project, San Francisco Ecology Center, 13 Columbus Avenue, San Francisco 94111 



'A lingering, agonizing 
death 

The Neutron Bomb de- 
stroys all life within a 3 A mile 
radius, without damaging 
property. Because of its pie- 
cision, its limited fallout, and 
because it could kill invading 
soldiers without damaging 
allied property, it invites use. 
President Carter says that 
even though he wants the 
weapon developed, he would 
not use it. After our experi- 
ence of the past ten years, 
can we trust such assur- 
ances? 

The N-Bomb causes a 
lingering, agonizing death. 
The central nervous system 
collapses and the victim dies 
from a form of extreme 
shock. The body convulses 
and the nervous system fails. 
All body functions, even 
breathing, rapidly break 
down. Death comes within 48 
hours from respiratory failure 
or a swelling of the tissues of 
the brain. Farther from the 
blast site, victims can look 
forward to two weeks or 
more of agony before certain 
death. There is no escape. 

We encourage you to reprint this 
message or to place it in publica- 
tions in your area. No prior 
permission is needed. 



* 

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I A19>: 
September 1977/KPFA FOLIO 25 



6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

Further coverage of what's in the news. 

7:30 IRANIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION 
News Analysis and Culture of the Persian Gulf 
Region. Essential information on the Shah's 
anti-democratic, fascist rule and U.S. involve- 
ment in Iran. Presented in Farsi. 

7:30 CSUF WOMEN'S STUDIES COURSE 

Broadcast on KFCF 88.1 FM for listeners 
in the Central San Joaquin Valley. 

8:30 ODE TO GRAVITY 
Composers Laureate. Charles Amirkhanian 
introduces electronic and recorded media 
works by women composers. Laurie Spiegel 
is a professional computer programmer 
working in New Jersey at Bell Labs where 
she has created numerous very inventive 
electronic pieces in a variety of styles. 
Performance artist Laurie Anderson writes 
pieces involving words which are spoken or 
sung against quixotic germs of instrumental 
accompaniment, often played on her instru- 
ment, the violin. She is currently composer- 



in-residence at.Cal Arts (Valencia) and an 
album of her music was recently issued by 
Holly Solomon Gallery of New York. 
Other composers to be announced. 

10:00 FRUIT PUNCH 

A look at the lives of disabled gay men, fol- 
lowed by a further exploration of gay liter- 
ature. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 NIGHT KITCHEN 

With Bafi Scott. 

3:00 SKETCHES IN SOUND 

The second leg of this Trane trip. 



THURSDAY 

22 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

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Come to a Fiesta to bring justice in 
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at the Starry Plough with Hobo & 
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a feminist radio soap opera. Listen to 
Elaine, Carla and Sandy, and the many 
other women going through their daily 
lives. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 
Labor Day Music IV: From the five-record 
Columbia memorial to Pablo Casals, cellist, 
composer and conductor. BEETHOVEN: 
Sonata in A, Op. 69; SCHUBERT: Quintet 
in C; BRAHMS: Sonata No. 2 in F, Op. 99 
with Horzowski; and Casals telling about 
his early concerts for the workers and for 
world peace. Added bonus will be 
BRAHMS: Double Concerto with Jacques 
Thibaud. With Ron Erickson. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

The House of the Solitary Maggot (4). 
James Purdy reads his novel. (See listings 
9/19) 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 ROOTS OF CONSCIOUSNESS 

With Jeffrey Mishlove. 



1:15 JAMES PURDY 

Byron Bryant talks with the author of 
Malcolm, Color of Darkness, and many 
other novels, short stories and plays. Mr. 
Purdy is visiting Berkeley this summer to 
keep out of the heat and finish his new 
novel. 

2:00 THE THEATER AND 

MUSIC OF ESMERALDA 

A musical extravaganza dealing with the 
ways women and men cope with men. 
Esmeralda recorded some of her songs at 
KPFA, and tonight you will hear Where 
Does Love Live, Hot Nights, Cold Morn- 
ings, and Men. She will be here live to 
introduce her songs and to talk about her 
life and work with KPFA's Kevin Burke. 

3:00 THE REAL *ELECTRIC SYMPHONY 

With Ron Pellegrino and Frankie Mann. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
The Science Story, produced by science 
editor Laurie Garrett. . . followed by 
Lemon/Aid-consumer information for 

(Continued on P. 26) 




C w >^r mm ^ r ^ 










26 KPFA FOLIO/September 1977 




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merchandise on the rocks. Then, the 
Calendar of Events. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

Holes in the News. The Media Alliance 

panel reviews U.S. press performance over 

the last few weeks. Hosted by Elsa Knight 

Thompson. 

7:30 ANGELA SPEAKS 

Angela Davis with commentary, analysis 
and phone-ins on 848-4425. 

8:30 STUDENT MOVEMENT AWAKENS 

On Friday, June 3, 1977, seven of the nine 
University of California campuses held a 
series of demonstrations to protest the 
U.C. Regents investments in South Africa, 
the Bakke decision and cut-backs in Third 
World and minority student admissions, 
programs and faculty. This program high- 
lights the activities of that day and elicits 
the response of listeners through the KPFA 
phone lines as the campuses gear up to 
another year in HIRE education. 

10:00 BUDCARVS 

OLD RADIO THEATRE 

Part 1 : The Philco Radio Time starring 
Crosby. Part 2: The Doctor Fights. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 MUSIC FROM THE 
HEARTS OF SPACE 

With Timitheo and Annamystyq. 

3:00 am SKETCHES IN SOUND ./ 
Third leg of a musical trip with John 
Coltrane. Produced by Klift B. Thomas. 

FRIDAY 



23 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 
Goodgiggly-wiggly, Kris! 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 
Music of Percy GRAINGER - 1 

Orchestral works: Country Gardens; 
Harvest Hymn; Under En Bro; Over the 
hills and far away; The lonely desert man 
sees the tents of the happy tribes; Colonial 
Song; Duke of Marlborough Fanfare; 
Shallow Brown; Handel in the Strand; 
Harvest Hymn; La Vallce des Cloches (ar- 
ranged from Ravel); Scotch Strathspey 
and Reel Hopkins, Sydney Sym Orch 
(EMI EMD 5514 (50)J Piano works: 
Country Gardens; Nell(Faurc); Irish Tunc 
from County Deny; Molly on the Shore; 
To a Nordic Princess; Lullaby; Over the 
hills and far away; Handel in the Strand; 
Walking Tune; Knight and Shepherd's 
Hey; Sailor's Song; Eastern Intermezzo, 
Daniel Adni, piano [EMI HQS 1363 (53)1; 
Paraphrase on the Waltz of the Flowers 
from TCHAlKOWSKY's Nutcracker, 
Michael Ponti, piano (Turnabout TV-S 
34560(7)] With Charles Amirkhanian. The 
first of a series of programs exploring the 
works of pianist-composer Percy Grainger 
(1882-1961), a vastly underrated and mis- 
understood 20th Century music figure. 
His personal revolt against the Austro- 
German hegemony in Western classical 
music and his relatively open and non-aca- 
demic approach to musical expression are 
documented in these and other selections 
to be heard as a part of this survey of his 
music. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

"The House of the Solitary Maggot" (5) 
James Purdy reads his novel. (See listing 
9/19). 



11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 LUNCH PAIL 

With Mama O'Shea. Come to Mama and 

all sorts of goodies await you. 

1:00 PEOPLE PLAYING MUSIC 

Live music from our studios presented by 
Gerda Daly. 

2:00 OFF CAMERA 

A Behind-the-Scene look at the Ait and In- 
dustry of Film and Video. Conversations 
with producers, actors, directors, tech- 
nicians, critics, exhibitors, distributors. 
With Padreigin McGillicuddy. 

2:30 UPSTAGED 

Irene Oppenheim with reviews and inter- 
views in the performing arts. 

3:00 PIG IN A PEN 

A program of traditional and contemporary 
bluegrass and old-time music with Ray 
Edlund. Today's program brings you the 
last part of a four-part series titled "The 
History of Bluegrass Music" produced by 
Mark Yacovonne of Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania and Bob Artis, author of Bluegrass- 
the highly acclaimed book dealing with 
the roots and history of this traditional 
style of American music. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Community Open Air: Access for community 
and political activists . . . then, Diamond 
and Christine give you their tips for this Fri- 
day Night at the Movies . . . after which 
Philip Maldari gives you the rundown on 
this weekend's Calendar of Events. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

Hosted by Mama O'Shea. 

7:30 LATIN AMERICA AWAKENS 

Latinoamerica Despierta Collective pre- 
sents a bilingual program covering the 
social and political events that affect 
Latin Americans and Third World people 
who live in the U.S. 

8:30 1750 ARCH STREET 
From the 1750 Arch Tape Archives. Award 
winning works for cello, from a competition 
sponsored by the California Cello Club. 
Performers include: Sally Kell and Patrice 
Hambelton; Amy Radner; Irene Sharp: 
Margaret Tait and Sharon Polk: and others. 
Composers include: William Penn, Victor 
Saucedo, David Bates, Robert Hughes and 
Gregory Kosteck. Recorded on June 5. 
1976 at St. John's Church. 

10:30 GOON SHOW 

Bulldog Seagoon's First Cast (or Emperor 
of the Universe). Mylos Sonku introduces 
another from the famous comedy series b\ 
the BBC with Peter Sellers, Spike Milligan 
and Harry Seacombe. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 CRUISIN 1 

With Carl. 

SATURDAY 



24 



6:00 THE GOSPEL EXPERIENCE 

Traditional and contemporary gospel 
music with Emmit Powell. 

9:00 OLD TIME STORIES/ 
JAIME DE ANGULO 

Continuing our series of Northern Cali- 
fornia Indian tales and songs recorded by 
Jaime de Angulo in 1949. Jaime knew that 
the Indians' way of life was rapidly disa- 
pearing, and he learned many of the 

(Continued on P 2 7) 






September 1977/KPFA FOLIO 27 



languages, stories, and songs from old 
Indian friends. 

10:00 TELL IT LIKE IT IS 

A variety show for young people by the 
students from the Odyssey School Radio 
Collective. 




mni\t 



1 1 :00 FOCUS ON WOMEN COMPOSERS 

The folk music of Full Circle. A recording 
made possible by a California Arts Council 
grant. With commentary, produced by 
Fleur Helsingor. 

12:00 AHORA 

La Raza bilingual programming with news, 
history, music and poetry. 'Ahora' means 
now. 

3:00 THE MOTHERLODE 

Sounds of people changing the world. Inter- 
views with community and workplace organ- 
izers. . . soul music. . . reports on move- 
ments of national liberation. . . jazz and 
at about 5:30, the Calendar of Events. Pro- 
duced by Laurie Simms and Judy Gerber. 

6:00 FREEDOM IS A 

CONSTANT STRUGGLE 

Voices of people in struggle-in the com- 
munity, across the nation, around the 
world-throughout history and now. Pro- 
duced by Barbara Lubinski and Heber. 

1 :00 am DONNEL'S MUSIC THEATRE 

The best in music is what you get-blues to 
jazz and all variations in between. 

SUNDAY 



25 



8:00 BACH CANTATA 



8:30 SLEEPERS! AWAKE 

A bit of Sunday tradition with Bill Sokol. 

11:00 JAZZ, BLUES 

& PHIL ELWOOD 

1:00 SUNDAY OPERA 
Moniuszko HRABINA. By popular 
request, another program of music by the 
greatest of Polish opera composers. Pre- 
sented by Mel Jahn. 

3:00 THE VISUAL ARTS 

John Fitzgibbon with guest artists and 
reviews of current shows. 

3:30 PROBABILITIES 
The Pulps: A look at the early days of 
science fiction. Richard Lupoff talks with 
Fritz Leiber and Lawrence Davidson talks 
with Frank M. Robinson about Weird Tales, 
Astounding, and the other great magazines 
that have become legends. 

4:30 THROUGH A WOMAN'S EYE 

Karla Tonella visits with Cecile McCann 
editor and publisher of Artweek, the major 
source of information and reviews about 
West Coast visual arts. Produced by 
Karla Tonella. 

5:00 BANKS OF SWEET PRIMROSE 

With Steve Meyer. 

6:00 SUNDAY NEWS 

6:30 SOVIET PRESS & PERIODICALS 

William Mandel's review of the Soviet pers- 
pective on the important questions of the 



day, national and international. 

7:00 ASK YOUR MAMA 

The world of Black music and literature. 
At 9 p.m. Langston Hughes' The Best of 
Simple, read by Ossie Davis. 

10:00 BEYOND THE RIVER 

Last Chants continues with mostly music 
and some legends from the back rooms of 
spaceship Earth with Jon Longcore. 

12:00 am STATE OV EMERGENCY/ 
PRISON POETRY 

Human expression with Max Schwartz. 

2:00 am BLUES IN THE NIGHT 

Chris Potter suits your taste. 

MONDAY 



26 



7:15 AM/FM 

Another week with Kris Welch 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 

With Bari Scott. 

11:15 MORNING READING 
Married Love (1) by George Meredith. The 
dramatic poem about the breakdown of a 
marriage is read by John Westbrook and 
Joan Murray Simpson. 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 AIN'T 1 A WOMAN! 

Documentaries, interviews, music and 
poetry by, for and about women. 

1:00 TAKE CONTROL 

Health information for women and chil- 
dren presented with loving care and 
good sense by the Berkeley Women's 
Health Collective. 

2:00 AFRO-BLUE 

Music expressed by African and New World 
Peoples. Produced by Sandie Agida and 
engineered by Chana Wilson 

3:00 TRADITIONAL AMERICAN MUSIC 

"Maple on the Hill" with Jane and Larry. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Labor Commentary with Dick Meister . . . 
then phone in your car troubles to Andy's 
Auto Clinic of the Air . . . stay tuned to 
the KPFA Calendar of Events to find out 
what's happening. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

7:30 CHINESE YOUTH VOICE 

7:30 CSUF WOMEN'S STUDIES COURSE 

Broadcast on KFCF 88.1 FM for listeners 
in the Central San Joaquin Valley. 

8:30 MUSIC OF INDIA MASTER CLASS 

With G.S. Sachdev 

10:00 JUST LIKE A MAN 
This is the second half of a program played 
last week at this time (see Folio for Sept 
19th) and tonight the members of the 
People's Media Collective will invite you 
to call in and make your ideas known. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 BLUES BY THE BAY 

With Tom Mazzolini. 

3:00 am BEEDLE UM BUM 

Jane & Larry mix musical traditions to ease 
you through the night and appease those 
blue devils. 




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TUESDAY 

27 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

Second minute of a new week with Kris 

Welch. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 

With Lou Judson. 

11:15 MORNING READING 
Married Love (2) by Judith Meredith. 

11:45 CALENDAR 



12:15 READINGS FROM THE 

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD 



1:00 FOLK MUSIC FROM 
NEAR AND FAR OUT 

Gerda Daly presents gems from her collec- 
tion of 78, 33 and 45 cylinder records. All 
countries/all cuhures/all eras. 

2:00 LUNCH AT DELANCEY STREET 

John Mahar, his guests and you dine on 
issues and answers to provocative ques- 
tions put to people in the public eye. 

3:00 PASSING THRU 

With Bari Scott. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Commentary with Harry Edwards introduces 
the sociology of sport to KPFA air in a way 
that takes in a lot of things besides sports . . . 
Survival Rights with John Yellin and the 
Calendar of Events. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 
Prison Issues with Bruce Goldstein lets you 
know what is going on inside and outside 
the walls of California's penal institutions. 

7:30 LIVING ON INDIAN TIME 

8:30 OPEN HOUR 

A Drama & Literature program. 

9:00 DUCK'S BREATH MYSTERY 
THEATRE 

A special half-hour radio extravaganza with 
the outrageous zanies from Iowa, Dan 
Coffey, Bill Allard, Merle Kessler, Jim 
Turner and Leon Martell, whose perfor- 
mances have left Bay Area audiences 
gasping with laughter over the past two 
years. Produced by Alan Soldofsky. 

9:30 OFF CAMERA SPECIAL - 
NICHOLAS RAY 

Nicholas Ray was one of America's 'cult' 
directors in the 50's, having begun his ca- 
reer in New York with Elia Kazan. He 
became one of the greatest "actors' direc- 
tors" that America has ever produced, 
and many of the finest actors gave their 
greatest performances under his direc- 
tion. He was greatly admired by the 
French. He is the best known for 
Rebel Without a Cause, Johnny Guitar, 
and 55 Days to Peking. He has 
directed over 20 films. Padreigin 
McGillicuddy interviewed Ray when he 
was in the Bay Area recently for a showing 
of his films at the Pacific Film Archive. 

10:00 AIN'T I A WOMAN 
Women's News and Commentary. Followed 
by Changing Directions: A Feminist 
Radio Soap Opera - Episode II (See Fo- 
lio Highlights) 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 



11:45 PIECES OF DREAMS 

With Andrew White. 

3:00 am SKETCHES IN SOUND 
Presented by Klift and Yolanda. 



WEDNESDAY 



28 



7:15 AM/FM 
With Kris Welch. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 
Music of Percy GRAINGER - II 

Duke of Marlborough Fanfare; The Immova- 
ble Do; Power of Rome and the Christian 
Heart Harry Begian, Univ of Illinois Sym- 
phonic Band [Illinois 74-75 (3,5.14)) The 
Warriors (Music for an Imaginary Ballet. 
1916); Green Bushes; Hill Song No. 2; 
Colonial Song; Shallow Brown; Spoon 
River; TJte Power of Love; Lord Peter's 
Stable Boy John Hopkins, Melbourne Sym 
Orch [Australian Broadcasting Corporation 
RRCS 131 (55)] English Folk Songs ar- 
ranged by Grainger: The Sprig of Thyme; 
Willow Willow; British Waterside; Six Dukes 
Went Afishin '; The Pretty Maid Milkin ' Her 
Cow; Shallow Brown; Died for Love; The 
Lost Lady Found. Robin Doveton, 
tenor; Victoria Hartung, piano [Prelude 
PMS 1502 (21)) With Charles Amirkhanian. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

Local gay men read their work. 

11:45 CALENDAR 
12:00 NOON NEWS 

12:15 WORLD MUSICS WITH GARFIAS 

Ethnomusicologist Robert Garfias surveys 
world musics in this series from KRAB in 
Seattle. 

1:00 TELL IT LIKE IT IS 

(Rebroadcast) 

2:00 NEW HORIZONS 
Explorations into the human condition and 
potential - Humanistic Perspectives on per- 
sonal growth and social change. The Healing 
Arts. A conversationwith Effie Poy Yew 
Choy, Ph.D. and President of the East West 
Academy of Healing Arts, about the work 
and purposes of the Academy. Michael 
Toms and Re Couture hosts. 

3:00 REGGAE EXPERIENCE 

Music and news with Ralph Miller. 

5:00 THIRD WORLD NEWS 

A magazine of information, music and 
announcements about issues and events 
of concern to Third World communities. 
A new addition to our format is Body and 
Soul, views and news about health. Pro- 
duced live from the Third World News 
Bureau in Oakland. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

7:30 IRANIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION 
News Analysis and Culture of the Persian 
Gulf Region. Essential information on the 
Shah's anti-democratic, fascist rule and 
U.S. involvement in Iran. Presented in Farsi. 

8:30 MUSIC IN AMERICA 

Chris Strachwitz presents that old-timey 
music 

10:00 FRUIT PUNCH 
How are gay men discriminated against in 
"Gay Mecca". Tonight we look at subtle 
and-not-so-subtle discrimination in gay 

(Continued on P. 30) 



^e\mnvftf*tfWftX\t> & 



LEMON/AID 



by Ken McEldowney 



Consumers tend to be very trusting people. When we eat out or shop at our 
local supermarket, we assume that the food will be sanitary, that a pound will 
weigh 16 ounces and that we won't be misled by false labelling. 

Unfortunately, the public agencies that we rely on for the regulations and ins- 
pections often don't do the job. And when they don't, it's the consumer that's 
stuck with the rotten food or the under weight package. Here are some of the ca- 
ses I have run into over the last couple of years: 

1. As part of a nation-wide survey, I tested the bacteria content of hamburger 
at local supermarkets. One chain had potentially dangerous meat because they did 
not keep their grinder in a refrigerated room and Berkeley health inspectors had 
never said anything. 

2. A student reporter making the round of restaurants with a San Francisco 
official never wrote down anything more critical than "fair". In all innocence the 
student asked what does it take for a restaurant to get a "poor"! The answer: "Well 
maybe if there is feces spread on the walls." 

3. Inspections by San Francisco Weights and Measures officials continuously 
find supermarkets with meat packages that weigh at least a half ounce less than 
the package indicates. 

4. Two years ago Consumer Action discovered that a local salvage food chain 
was selling canned and packaged food that was so damaged that it posed a possi- 
ble health hazard. For some reason the health inspectors couldn't find what we 
found. 

Enough! Enough! I won't even bring up the golden oldies like the cranberry 
scare or various tuna fish recalls. Inspectors tend to be overworked and, unless 
there is strong public pressure, agencies will try to save money by cutting back 
on the time they spend to protect the food we buy. 

One example this time: A city official in Los Angeles recently made the mis- 
take of trying to enforce a law that said that if a menu promised fresh vegetables, 
they had to be fresh, and if you order abalone that's what you are served. Well, 
the restaurants screamed. They saved money and kept their image up by calling 
canned and frozens vegetables fresh and by calling flattened squid abalone. The 
official was transferred and the restaurants still don't have to tell the truth. 

We need to learn what agencies have jurisdiction over different food products 



and be willing to complain if we believe they are not doing a good job, or if we buy 
an item that is spoiled. Often it's hard to even find out where to complain. I cal- 
led up the Federal Information Center and asked what agency would handle a 
complaint about a bad can of tuna. Without hesitation he said "The Consumer 
Product Saftey Commission." Not even close. It's the U.S. Food & Drug Admin- 
istration. 

Call up your county health department and ask when the last time your local 
supermarket was inspected. Or call Weights and Measures and ask when they last 
checked to make sure you were getting 16 ounces to a pound on your T-bone 
steak. Stores should be inspected a minimum of three or four times a year. Ask 
the agencies what problems they found and what follow-up they made to make 
sure that corrections were made. 

As a guide to complaining I have compiled the following list of agencies. Use 
it both to determine who should be protecting your food on a regular basis and 
to figure out who should get your complaint when your milk carton isn't full or 
your canned fruit is off-color. 

U.S. Food and Drug has jurisdiction over all processed food, including fish, 
fruit and vegetables that are shipped from one state to another. One exception — 
they don't handle meat and poultry. In Northern California call their regional 
office at (41 5) 556-2062. 

California Food Drug has similar duties but handles processed foods that 
never leaves the state from the grower to your table. Their regional office is at 
(415) 843-7900 ext. 426. (In Santa Rosa - (707) 545-7387; Santa Clara - (408) 
244-1353 and in Fresno - (209) 291-6676.) 

California Department of Food and Agriculture - Dairy Section handles in- 
spections and complaints concerning milk and other dairy products. Their 

regional number is (415)464-1 100. In Fresno call (209)488-5506. 

U.S. Department of Agriculture has responsibility for canned, frozen and 
other processed meat and poultry that comes into California from other states 
or other countries. Their regional office can be reached at (415) 273-7788. 

County Weights and Measures checks the scales in all supermarkets as well as 
making spot checks of the weight of packages of meat, butter and other dairy pro- 
ducts. They also check out any complaint about a food product you think doesn't 
weigh as much as it should. Your local office is listed in the white pages of your 
telephone book under county government. 

Don't just complain to the governmental agency. Send an angry letter to the 
supermarket where you bought the item and also send a letter to the company 
that made the faulty product. Let them know that you complained to the gov- 
ernment. Most companies don't_want angry customers and will usually go out of 
their way to win you back. 



GR1MBLERNGER 

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30 KPFA FOLIO/September 1977 



men's bars and baths. We'll also document 
discrimination faced by gay men in child- 
rearing and in the schools. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 NIGHT KITCHEN 

With Bari Scott. 

3:00 am SKETCHES IN SOUND 



THURSDAY 

29 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 

One more day in the month to go. 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 
Labor Day Music V. Work songs from var- 
ious folk traditions often consist of re- 
peated strophes which change only slightly. 
The sound is essentially static and one's 
attention is drawn to the subtle variations. 
Minimalist composers today, such as Philip 
Glass, Terry Riley and LaMonte Young 
employ similar techniques, and we'll in- 
vestigate this kind of music. Presented 
by Ron Erickson. 

11:15 MORNING READING 

11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 ROOTS OF CONSCIOUSNESS 

Produced by Jeffrey Mishlove. 

1:15 D&L OPEN HOUR 

2:00 DUCK'S BREATH 

MYSTERY THEATER 

(Rebroadcast) 

2:30 OFF CAMERA 
A behind-the-Scene look at the Art and 
Industry of Film and Video. Conversations 
with producers, actors, directors, techni- 
cians, critics, exhibitors and distributors. 
With Padreigin McGillicuddy. 

3:00 THE REAL *ELECTRIC SYMPHONY 

With Ron Pellegrino and Frankie Mann. 



5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Open Air . . . then Ken McEldowney with 
Lemon/ Aid, and the Calendar of Events 
until News time. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

7:30 THIRD WORLD COLLAGE 
Islands Under the Eagle. In 1898, at the 
end of the Spanish American war, the 
Philippines and Puerto Rico both passed 
from Spanish rule to the domination of the 
United States. That domination has taken 
different forms. Today the Philippines are 
under martial law while Puerto Rico faces 
possible annexation by the U.S. The Third 
World Bureau presents a special one-hour 
program commemorating the anniversaries 
of the Lares uprising of 1868 and the de- 
claration of martial law. 

8:30 TELEPHONE VOICES 

How many times have you heard her say, 
"The number you have reached . . .?" but 
have you wondered who that person really 
is? An interview with the woman who says 
that this is a recording is only one of the 
highlights in this look behind the scenes 
at Ma Bell. Seasoned with snippets of song 
from Lily Tomlin and Lenny Bruce. Listen 
to the voices behind the voices. Produced 
by KPFT. 

9:00 8 BILLION BURGERS TO EARTH 

Fast food industries like McDonalds are 
changing American life faster than you 
think. A documentary produced by Peggy. 
Stein and Glenn Hirsch for KPFA Public 
Affairs gets into the meat of the fast food | 
industry. 

10:00 BUDCARVSOLD 
RADIO THEATRE 

The Telephone Hour and The Voice of 
Firestone. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 MUSIC FROM THE 
HEARTS OF SPACE 

With Timitheo and Annamystyq. 

3:00 am SKETCHES IN SOUND 

Some more super duper sounds from that 
changing American life . Presented by Klift B 
Thomas & Yolanda D. Smith. 



Ulti«HIHl!lMIMmiHliHWKI| 



IIMHIIHIUll 



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WHO KILLED KENNEDY: ANOTHER VIEW. SEPT. 30, 8 P.M. 
Slide Show & Panel Discussion. At La Pena Cultural Center, Shat- 
tuck at Prince, Berkeley. Donation: $2.00 to Benefit KPFA. 

The Northwest Assassination Committee has been amassing evi- 
dence surrounding the Kennedy Assassination. They believe they 
have enough documented evidence to bring to trial Richard Nixon, 
E. Howard Hunt and Frank Sturgis of the CIA. They support their 
case with slides and photographs that cover the preparations for the 
invasion of Cuba, the Zapruder film and the "tramp" photos. Paul 
Kangas of the Committee says that none of the "professional assassi- 
nologists" will even debate him about the findings. Make a note of 
the date and plan to come and see this fascinating show and be pre- 
pared to ask your questions. 



IJB^HgiHlMlllHIllVhlHWiWaHVBU^BlllMliiHiiinK'iHieiHlilHl.VIHHliHi^lH.^H^H^B) 







FRIDAY 

30 



7:00 MORNING NEWS 

7:15 AM/FM 
That's it Vail! 

8:45 MORNING NEWS 

9:00 MORNING CONCERT 
Music of Percy GRAINGER - III 

Salute to Percy Grainger from Benjamin 
Britten (Vocal and Orchestral Selections 
recorded 1969) I'm Seventeen Come 
Sunday; Bold William Taylor; There Was a 
Pig Went out to Dig; My Robin Is to the 
Greenwood Gone; Lord Maxwell's Good- 
night; Let 's Dance Gay in Green Meadow; 
Lisbon; The Lost Lady Found. Peter 
Pears, tenor; John Shirley-Quirk, baritone; 
Viola Tunnard, piano; Benjamin Britten, 
English Chamber Orchestra; Ambrosian 
Singers [London CS 6632 (27) J GRIEG: 
Piano Concerto, Op. 16, in A Minor, 
Percy Grainger, piano, Leopold Stokowski, 
Hollywood Bowl Symphony Orchestra 
[International Piano Archives IPA 508 - 
(25)] ; Historical Recordings: 
Percy Grainger at the piano. JubaJDance 
(Nathaniel Dett); One More Day, My 
John; Country Gardens; Molly on the 
Shore; Shepher'd Hey; Irish Air from 
County Deny; Reel and Leprechaun's 
Dance, from Four Irish Dances (Stanford); 
Sussex Mummers (Christmas Carol); Gum 
Sucker's March (from "In a Nutshell" 
Grainger, piano (recorded 1915, 1920 & 
1947) Columbia & Decca 78 rpm discs; 
Duo-Art Player Piano Rolls [KPFA Tape 
(64)| Benjamin Britten's collection of 
Grainger's music, recorded in 1969 with 
the English Chamber Orchestra, marked the 
beginning of a revival of interest. A second 
collection, also featuring Britten as perfor- 
mer, was recorded in 1972 and will be re- 
leased later this year bv Entdish Decca. One 



of Grainger's heroes was the Norwegian 
composer Edvard Grieg whose work with 
Scandinavian folk music inspired and vali- 
dated Grainger's similar interest. Grainger 
was the concert pianist who introduced the 
Grieg Piano Concerto and played it countless 
times in concert appearances the world over. 
Our thanks to Tom Lincoln for providing 
tapes of rate Grainger performances for 
this and other programs. The concert is 
hosted by Charles Amirkhanian. 

11:15 MORNING READING 
11:45 CALENDAR 

12:15 LUNCH PAIL 

With Mama O'Shea. Come to Mama and all 
sorts of goodies await you. 

1:00 PEOPLE PLAYING MUSIC 

Live music from our studios presented by 
Gerda Daly. 

2:00 PREVIEWS FROM DRAMA & 
LITERATURE 

Previews of new programs from the Drama & 
Literature Department. 

3:00 GREAT AMERICAN MUSIC 

Country music with Tom Diamant. 

5:00 BEFORE THE NEWS 
Community Open Air: Phill Maldari inter- 
views Bay Area political and community 
activists. Followed lby the Weekend Calen- 
dar of Events. 

6:00 KPFA EVENING NEWS 

6:45 BEHIND THE NEWS 

Your host is Mama O'Shea. 

7:30 LATIN AMERICA AWAKENS 

8:30 1750 ARCH STREET 

From the 1 750 Arch Tape Archives. 



10:30 GOON SHOW 






Histories of Pliny the Elder. Mylos Sonka 
introduces another from the famous com- 
edy series by the BBC with Peter Sellers, 
Pike Milligan and Harry Seacombe. 

11:00 LATE NIGHT NEWS 

11:45 CRUISIN* 

With Carl Stolz. 



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Open 9-6 Evenings by Appointment Berkeley. Calif. 94705 

When it comes to eyeglasses and contact lenses. The Focal Point 
offers the most complete service available. 



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September 1977/KPFA FOLIO 31 



BffPMiflnnxiBimnmwiiiiwiiHBniiinmHfiiB^^^ 



Classifieds 



'65 VW Bus, for sale. $300. Needs work. 
Mechanics inquiry preferred. Call Jerry 
Sager at 848-6767. 



Yoga-oriented boarding school for ages 9- 
14. Write Ananda Schools, 900 Alleghany 
Star Route, Nevada City, CA. 95959. 



■ 

1 

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Landscape Service: U.C. Grad. Land Arch. 
On site-consultation, plans, maintenance, 
gardening. Reasonable rates, references. 
587-4598 



Natural Foods Classes in Berkeley home. 
Cook and eat meatless meals and learn to 
plan healthy, hi-protein menus. Only four 
students per class. Lunch (outdoor child- 
care) or dinner. For October schedule 
leave name, address for Laura Rose, 841- 
6500. 



ARR1VEDFRCI JANET! 



■unmiHiuii 



mimitti 



IIUiBHHIinil 



KPFA SUPPORTER would like to hear 

from people who can actually hear the 

stato 

station: Claude Footman 

74A2005 

P.O. Box 149 

Attica, New York 14011. 



Would you write or visit a convict? W/M, 
34, 5'6", 150 lbs, would like to trade fas- 
cinating stories, golden dreams, be a friend, 
give a strong shoulder to lean on, or just be 
someone who you can talk to once in a- 
while. Write or visit: Marvin Hauber, Box 
B-41110, Tamal, Ca. 94964. 



ART DIRECTOR WANTED: Must have 
experience with newspapers and/or maga- 
zines. Layout, design and organizational 
abilities required. $200/wk., full benefits 
Send resume and samples of work to Ray 
Riegert, Berkeley Barb, P.O. Box 1247, 
Berkeley, CA. 94701. 

■iraiMHiinniHiHamHMBiHHmHnmiiBiiii 



• Workers Collective of Berkeley • 

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Levi's®, Sleeping Bags, 
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A low-cost clinic for dogs and cats is 
now open in Berkeley and provides 
SPAYING ~ NEUTERING -VACCINATIONS 

OPEN TUESDAY- FRIDAY 

CITY OF BERKELEY SPAY & NEUTER CLINIC 
2070 GROVE STREET BERKELEY 

CALL 644-6721 FOR INFORMATION 



EID'sT.V. 1702 GROVE STREET, BERKELEY 848-6552 
Free Estimates on T.V. repair * Work guaranteed six months * Quality work 
at popular prices * We buy T.V.'s working or not * OPEN 11 am — 6 pm. 



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Custom photographic services 



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1908 Alcatraz 
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all the mice desert it.' 
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AD 23 - 79 



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EVERYTHING $ 
MUSICAL 5 

Guitars * Pianos r\ 

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Our New Outlet is 
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inkworks 

COLLECTIVE PRINTING 

4220 Telegraph Av 

Oakland, CA 652-4364 

books, posters, pamphlets 



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Furniture Stripping & Refintshlng 
Any Recaning Job - with this ad 

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On September tl, 1973 

The government of democratically elected Salvador 
Allende ended in a coup which took thousands of lives 
and initiated Chile's still unbroken period of savage 
military rule. 

This year, on the 4th anniversary of the coup, many 
activities are planned in solidarity with the people of 
Chile. 

Come to La Peha Sept. 10, the 17th Jornada por Chile, 
an International Festival of Protest Songs, 8:30 pm, 
$1.50 includes wine & empanada; Sept. 11, showing 
2 films on Chile: "When the People Awake" and 
"Chile with Poems & Guns," 8:30 pm, $1 . 

To find out about other Chile activities phone 
Non-intervention in Chile at 548-3221 , or 
La Peha, at 849-2568 

Tiff* cultural center 



l??<2iia 



'3105 Shattuck Avenue 
Berkeley, California 94705 






TIME VALUE: 1 SEPTEMBER 

KPFA-FM 94 

2207 Shattuck Avenue. 

Berkeley, CA 94704 



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Finest Literary Magazine 

THE SAN FRANCISCO REVIEW OF BOOKS 

For book reviews you won't see elsewhere 
Interviews with some of America's finest writers 
Coverage of West Coast and Small Press publishing 

Recommended Reading — books that somehow get left off the bestseller lists 
Commentary from "The Western Spy" 

Forthcoming interviews: Lawrence Ferlinghetti (September issue); John Ashbery; Al 
Young; Susan Sontag 

A staff of writers that occasionally includes Alice Adams; Andrei Codrescu; William 
Kotzwinkle; Stanley Weintraub; Constance Casey on Children's Books; Eleanor Dickin- 
son and Jerome Tarshis on Art Books; Stephen Vincent on Poetry; Gloria Frym; Peter 
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